Released on 1979Categories Religion

A Buddhist Leader in Ming China

A Buddhist Leader in Ming China

Author: Sung-peng Hsu

Publisher: Penn State University Press

ISBN: UVA:X030126364

Category: Religion

Page: 250

View: 225

Although Buddhism had declined during the Ming Dynasty, an age characterized by corruption, weakness, and oppression, new interest in the old religion arose as the dynasty came to an end. Han-shan Te-ch'ing--as well as two other reformers of his time, Yun-ch'i Chu-hung (1535-1615) and Tzu-po Chen-k'o (1543-1603) contributed to the revival of Buddhism. Even to the present day, the teachings of these masters have influenced many Chinese Buddhists. Han-shan wrote extensively on Buddhism and other subjects, but his most interesting work is his autobiography, describing his spiritual development together with significant events of his life. Han-shan was a Ch'an master who also practiced the Pure Land faith. The philosophy of Mind, a synthesis of the Hua-yen, T'ien-t'ai, and Wei-shih teachings, is his system of thought. Han-shan argued that all philosophical teachings are ultimately the same because they lead to the truth of Mind. Dr. Hsu's book is the first detailed study of Han-shan Te-ch'ing's life to appear in any language. As Derk Bodde writes in his foreword, "A good deal of excellent modern scholarship has been devoted to the ascending centuries of Chinese Buddhism, extending from the religion's entry into China (first century AD) through its age of greatest glory (seventh, eighth, and early ninth centuries). Much less, yet nevertheless significant, scholarship has been devoted to the surviving elements of Chinese Buddhism that are still observable in the present century. Almost nonexistent--at least in Western languages has been serious scholarship devoted to the long centuries of intervening decline. The present book, which is the only one known to me in a Western language to devote itself wholly to a single personality from this intervening age, is a notable exception. A Buddhist Leader in Ming China consists of four chapters. In Chapter 1 the sources and methodology are discussed. Chapter 2 concerns the background of Han-shan Te-ch'ing's life and thought. Chapter 3 presents a detailed account of Han-shan's life, based almost entirely on his autobiography. The last chapter discusses his teachings and his views about the Mind, the Universe, Man, Evil, and the Path to Salvation.
Released on 2017Categories History

The Buddha Party

The Buddha Party

Author: John Powers

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199358151

Category: History

Page: 393

View: 327

The Buddha Party tells the story of how the People's Republic of China employs propaganda to define Tibetan Buddhist belief and sway opinion within the country and abroad. The narrative they create is at odds with historical facts and deliberately misleading but, John Powers argues, it is widely believed by Han Chinese. Most of China's leaders appear to deeply believe the official line regarding Tibet, which resonates with Han notions of themselves as China's most advanced nationality and as a benevolent race that liberates and culturally uplifts minority peoples. This in turn profoundly affects how the leadership interacts with their counterparts in other countries. Powers's study focuses in particular on the government's "patriotic education" campaign-an initiative that forces monks and nuns to participate in propaganda sessions and repeat official dogma. Powers contextualizes this within a larger campaign to transform China's religions into "patriotic" systems that endorse Communist Party policies. This book offers a powerful, comprehensive examination of this ongoing phenomenon, how it works and how Tibetans resist it.
Released on 2012Categories History

Ming China, 1368-1644

Ming China, 1368-1644

Author: John W. Dardess

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781442204911

Category: History

Page: 173

View: 370

This engaging, deeply informed book provides the first concise history of one of China's most important eras. Leading scholar John W. Dardess offers a thematically organized political, social, and economic exploration of China from 1368 to 1644. He examines how the Ming dynasty was able to endure for 276 years, illuminating Ming foreign relations and border control, the lives and careers of its sixteen emperors, its system of governance and the kinds of people who served it, its great class of literati, and finally the mass outlawry that, in unhappy conjunction with the Manchu invasions from outside, ended the once-mighty dynasty in the mid-seventeenth century. The Ming witnessed the beginning of China's contact with the West, and its story will fascinate all readers interested in global as well as Asian history.
Released on 1993Categories Religion

Critical Moments in Religious History

Critical Moments in Religious History

Author: Kenneth Keulman

Publisher: Mercer University Press

ISBN: 0865544115

Category: Religion

Page: 230

View: 230

These critical essays examine ways in which political culture interacts with the world's religions, and within the context of religious pluralism. The authors raise the issue regarding the way religion affects political modernization, and, conversely, how social and political realities may define and determine the boundaries of religion(s). Critical Moments in Religious History addresses issues of vital concern, religious and political, theological and social issues that, indeed, remain critical.
Released on 2003-01-01Categories Social Science

Popular Religious Movements and Heterodox Sects in Chinese History

Popular Religious Movements and Heterodox Sects in Chinese History

Author: Hubert Michael Seiwert

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004131469

Category: Social Science

Page: 584

View: 716

Annotation In rough chronological order from antiquity to the 19th century, Seiwert (comparative religion, Leipzig U.) identifies and describes religious communities and movements outside the official religion. For the period before the Ming dynasty, he looks at prophecies and messianism in Han Confucianism, popular sects and the early Daoist tradition, heterodox movements in medieval Buddhism, and popular sectarianism during the Song and Yuan dynasties. He devotes the second half of the book to the Ming and Qing dynasties. Ma Xisha (world religions, Chinese Academy for the Social Sciences) collaborated on the work. Annotation (c)2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com).
Released on 2001-01-01Categories Religion

Cultural Intersections in Later Chinese Buddhism

Cultural Intersections in Later Chinese Buddhism

Author: Marsha Smith Weidner

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN: 0824823087

Category: Religion

Page: 252

View: 433

This collection of essays on later Chinese Buddhism takes us beyond the bedrock subjects of traditional Buddhist historiography - scriptures and commentaries, sectarian developments, lives of notable monks - to examine a wide range of extracanonical materials that illuminate cultural manifestations of Buddhism from the Song dynasty (960-1279) through the modern period. Straying from well-trodden paths, the authors often transgress the boundaries of their own disciplines: historians address architecture; art historians look to politics; a specialist in literature treats poetry that offers gendered insights into Buddhist lives. The broad-based cultural orientation of this volume is predicated on the recognition that art and religion are not closed systems requiring only minimal cross-indexing with other social or aesthetic phenomena but constituent elements in interlocking networks of practice and belief.
Released on 2020-08-25Categories History

In the Wake of the Mongols

In the Wake of the Mongols

Author: Jinping Wang

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9781684171002

Category: History

Page: 366

View: 934

"The Mongol conquest of north China between 1211 and 1234 inflicted terrible wartime destruction, wiping out more than one-third of the population and dismantling the existing social order. In the Wake of the Mongols recounts the riveting story of how northern Chinese men and women adapted to these trying circumstances and interacted with their alien Mongol conquerors to create a drastically new social order. To construct this story, the book uses a previously unknown source of inscriptions recorded on stone tablets.Jinping Wang explores a north China where Mongol patrons, Daoist priests, Buddhist monks, and sometimes single women—rather than Confucian gentry—exercised power and shaped events, a portrait that upends the conventional view of imperial Chinese society. Setting the stage by portraying the late Jin and closing by tracing the Mongol period’s legacy during the Ming dynasty, she delineates the changing social dynamics over four centuries in the northern province of Shanxi, still a poorly understood region."
Released on 2021-03-02Categories Religion

The Renewal of Buddhism in China

The Renewal of Buddhism in China

Author: Chün-fang Yü

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231552677

Category: Religion

Page:

View: 691

First published in 1981, The Renewal of Buddhism in China broke new ground in the study of Chinese Buddhism. An interdisciplinary study of a Buddhist master and reformer in late Ming China, it challenged the conventional view that Buddhism had reached its height under the Tang dynasty (618–907) and steadily declined afterward. Chün-fang Yü details how in sixteenth-century China, Buddhism entered a period of revitalization due in large part to a cohort of innovative monks who sought to transcend sectarian rivalries and doctrinal specialization. She examines the life, work, and teaching of one of the most important of these monks, Zhuhong (1535–1615), a charismatic teacher of lay Buddhists and a successful reformer of monastic Buddhism. Zhuhong’s contributions demonstrate that the late Ming was one of the most creative periods in Chinese intellectual and religious history. Weaving together diverse sources—scriptures, dynastic history, Buddhist chronicles, monks’ biographies, letters, ritual manuals, legal codes, and literature—Yü grounds Buddhism in the reality of Ming society, highlighting distinctive lay Buddhist practices to provide a vivid portrait of lived religion. Since the book was published four decades ago, many have written on the diversity of Buddhist beliefs and practices in the centuries before and after Zhuhong’s time, yet The Renewal of Buddhism in China remains a crucial touchstone for all scholarship on post-Tang Buddhism. This fortieth anniversary edition features updated transliteration, a foreword by Daniel B. Stevenson, and an updated introduction by the author speaking to the ongoing relevance of this classic work.
Released on 2022-07-15Categories History

A Ming Society

A Ming Society

Author: John W. Dardess

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520365674

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 870

John Dardess has selected a region of great political and intellectual importance, but one which local history has left almost untouched, for this detailed social history of T'ai-ho county during the Ming dynasty. Rather than making a sweeping, general survey of the region, he follows the careers of a large number of native sons and their relationship to Ming imperial politics. Using previously unexplored primary sources, Dardess details the rise and development of T'ai-ho village kinship, family lineage, landscape, agriculture, and economy. He follows its literati to positions of prominence in imperial government. This concentration on the history of one county over almost three centuries gives rise to an unusually sound and immediate understanding of how Ming society functioned and changed over time. This title is part of UC Press's Voices Revived program, which commemorates University of California Press’s mission to seek out and cultivate the brightest minds and give them voice, reach, and impact. Drawing on a backlist dating to 1893, Voices Revived makes high-quality, peer-reviewed scholarship accessible once again using print-on-demand technology. This title was originally published in 1996.
Released on 2006Categories History

Community Schools and the State in Ming China

Community Schools and the State in Ming China

Author: Sarah Schneewind

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 0804751749

Category: History

Page: 326

View: 845

According to imperial edict in pre-modern China, an elementary school was to be established in every village in the empire for any boy to attend. This book looks at how the schools worked, how they changed over time, and who promoted them and why. Over the course of the Ming period (1368-1644), schools were sponsored first by the emperor, then by the central bureaucracy, then by local officials, and finally by the people themselves. The changing uses of schools helps us to understand how the Ming state related to society over the course of nearly 300 years, and what they can show us about community and political debates then and now.