Released on 2021-09-20Categories Language Arts & Disciplines

A Grammar of Shaowu

A Grammar of Shaowu

Author: Sing Sing Ngai

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9781501512483

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 733

View: 170

This is the first comprehensive grammar of Shaowu, a Min language spoken in Shaowu city and its environs in northwestern Fujian province, China. The book offers first-hand linguistic data collected over four years in the field, now placed at the disposal of researchers and students working in language documentation, comparative linguistics and Sinitic typology. It can serve as a reference grammar for those interested in learning the Shaowu language, thereby helping to preserve it. In addition, the book provides insights into Shaowu's classification which has been widely debated, thus elucidating its genetic affiliation. The book first presents Shaowu's geography, demography and history. It then profiles the language's phonology and lexicon, before providing a detailed description of its syntax, notably on its nominal, predicate, clausal and complex sentence structures, which are the focus of the book. The typological profile of Shaowu is also treated with the conclusion that the language has Gan, Hakka, Mandarin and even some Wu overlays on its Min base. The Shaowu language serves an excellent example to illustrate the degree of hybridity a language can attain due to intensive language contact over time.
Released on 2020-02-10Categories Language Arts & Disciplines

A Grammar of Southern Min

A Grammar of Southern Min

Author: Weirong Chen

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9781501511868

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 542

View: 228

Southern Min (also known as Hokkien or Minnan) is a major branch of Chinese spoken mainly in Fujian and Taiwan, but also in Guangdong, Hainan and Hong Kong, as well as in many countries of Southeast Asia. Highly conservative in its linguistic profile, it is considered by many scholars to be a living language fossil due to the preservation of many archaic features that reflect its long-lasting history and culture. Yet to date there has been no comprehensive study of Southern Min using a typological framework, as the tendency is to base analyses on the model of Mandarin Chinese, the standard language. This grammar aims to present a systematic description of the Hui'an variety of Southern Min, mainly based on data collected via naturally occurring conversation. The volume includes four parts: nominal structure, predicate structure, clause structure and complex sentences, as well as a brief overview of phonology. It will have great appeal for heritage speakers, graduate students and scholars in both Chinese linguistics and typology.
Released on 2015-12-04Categories Language Arts & Disciplines

Diversity in Sinitic Languages

Diversity in Sinitic Languages

Author: Hilary M. Chappell

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191035739

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 384

View: 977

This book presents new research into the great structural diversity found in Sinitic languages. While many studies focus principally on Standard Mandarin, this work draws on extensive empirical data from lesser-known languages, and seeks to dispel many recurrent linguistic myths about the Sinitic language family. Part I presents findings that show the important interplay of research into diachronic linguistics and typology in China, beginning with a discussion of how to tackle the issue of linguistic diversity in Sinitic languages. Chapters in Part II examine the Sinitic languages from a crosslinguistic perspective with pan-Sinitic explorations of demonstrative paradigms; bare classifier phrases in relation to the coding of definiteness; and of the diachronic development of two main structures for comparatives of inequality with respect to issues in language contact. Part III is devoted to individual studies of linguistic micro-areas in China: Pinghua and the Guangxi Autonomous Region in the far South of China; Shaowu Min in the northwestern corner of Fujian province; the Wu dialect of Fuyang; and the Hui'an Southern Min dialect in the South of Fujian province.
Released on 2018-02-19Categories Language Arts & Disciplines

A Grammar of Gan Chinese

A Grammar of Gan Chinese

Author: Xuping Li

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9781501507267

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 331

View: 536

China is very rich in language resources, and Mandarin is undoubtedly its most prestigious and well-known representative. Unfortunately, most of these languages remain understudied or even unstudied. Such is the case of Yichun Gan. Written in the style of a reference grammar, this book sets out to give a comprehensive and systematic description of Yichun grammar, with the aim of increasing readers' knowledge about Chinese languages other than Mandarin. In addition to common categories like nouns, verbs, adjectives and prepositions, the volume attempts to cover as many grammatical categories and constructions as possible, including the Sinitic-specific categories such as classifiers, the aspect system, postpositions and the object-marking BA constructions. To highlight its uniqueness, the book adopts a comparative perspective to contrast many features of Yichun Gan with Mandarin and other Sinitic languages. Our study shows that Yichun Gan possesses both Northern and Southern Chinese traits in many constructions, which supports its status as a transitional language. It will be of interest to linguists who wish to learn more about East Asian languages, and more specifically Sinitic languages.
Released on 2017-03-06Categories Religion

Protestant Bible Translation and Mandarin as the National Language of China

Protestant Bible Translation and Mandarin as the National Language of China

Author: George Kam Wah Mak

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004316300

Category: Religion

Page: 427

View: 818

Looking into the translation, publication, circulation and use of the Mandarin Bible, this book examines the relationship between Protestant Bible translation and the development of Mandarin into the national language of China during the late Qing and Republican era.
Released on 2014-07-28Categories Language Arts & Disciplines

Identity Relations in Grammar

Identity Relations in Grammar

Author: Kuniya Nasukawa

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9781614518983

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 381

View: 750

Few concepts are as ubiquitous in the physical world of humans as that of identity. Laws of nature crucially involve relations of identity and non-identity, the act of identifying is central to most cognitive processes, and the structure of human language is determined in many different ways by considerations of identity and its opposite. The purpose of this book is to bring together research from a broad scale of domains of grammar that have a bearing on the role that identity plays in the structure of grammatical representations and principles. Beyond a great many analytical puzzles, the creation and avoidance of identity in grammar raise a lot of fundamental and hard questions. These include: Why is identity sometimes tolerated or even necessary, while in other contexts it must be avoided? What are the properties of complex elements that contribute to configurations of identity (XX)? What structural notions of closeness or distance determine whether an offending XX-relation exists or, inversely, whether two more or less distant elements satisfy some requirement of identity? Is it possible to generalize over the specific principles that govern (non-)identity in the various components of grammar, or are such comparisons merely metaphorical? Indeed, can we define the notion of identity in a formal way that will allow us to decide which of the manifold phenomena that we can think of are genuine instances of some identity (avoidance) effect? If identity avoidance is a manifestation in grammar of some much more encompassing principle, some law of nature, then how is it possible that what does and what does not count as identical in the grammars of different languages seems to be subject to considerable variation?
Released on 2018-10-18Categories Language Arts & Disciplines

Grammaticalization from a Typological Perspective

Grammaticalization from a Typological Perspective

Author: Heiko Narrog

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192515353

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 448

View: 679

This volume explores the way in which grammaticalization processes - whereby lexical words eventually become markers of grammatical categories - converge and differ across various types of language. While grammaticalization at its core is a unidirectional phenomenon, in which the same pathways of change are replicated across languages, certain language types and language areas have distinct preferences with respect to what they grammaticalize and how. Previous work has principally addressed this question with specific reference to languages of Southeast and East Asia that do not seem to grammaticalize paradigms of categories in the same manner as Indo-European languages, or form extensive grammaticalization chains. This volume takes a broader approach and proceeds systematically area by area: specialists in the field address the processes of grammaticalization in languages of Africa, Europe, Asia and the Pacific, and the Americas, and in creole languages. The studies reveal a number of unique pathways of grammaticalization in each language area, as well as identifying the universal shared features of the phenomenon.
Released on 2015Categories Foreign Language Study

Diversity in Sinitic Languages

Diversity in Sinitic Languages

Author: Hilary Chappell

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198723790

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 334

View: 398

This book presents new research into the great structural diversity found in Sinitic languages. While many studies focus principally on Standard Mandarin, this work draws on extensive empirical data from lesser-known languages, and seeks to dispel many recurrent linguistic myths about the Sinitic language family. Part I presents findings that show the important interplay of research into diachronic linguistics and typology in China, beginning with a discussion of how to tackle the issue of linguistic diversity in Sinitic languages. Chapters in Part II examine the Sinitic languages from a crosslinguistic perspective with pan-Sinitic explorations of demonstrative paradigms; bare classifier phrases in relation to the coding of definiteness; and of the diachronic development of two main structures for comparatives of inequality with respect to issues in language contact. Part III is devoted to individual studies of linguistic micro-areas in China: Pinghua and the Guangxi Autonomous Region in the far South of China; Shaowu Min in the northwestern corner of Fujian province; the Wu dialect of Fuyang; and the Hui'an Southern Min dialect in the South of Fujian province.
Released on 2015-01-14Categories Language Arts & Disciplines

Causation, Permission, and Transfer

Causation, Permission, and Transfer

Author: Brian Nolan

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing Company

ISBN: 9789027268976

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 499

View: 387

This book offers a comprehensive investigative study of the argument realisation of the concepts of causative purpose, permit, let/allow and transfer in a broad cross-linguistic typologically diverse mix of languages with GIVE, GET, TAKE, PUT, and LET verbs. This volume stands as the first systematic exploration of these verbs and concepts as they occur in complex events and clauses. This book brings together scholars and researchers from a variety of functionally inspired theoretical backgrounds that have worked on these verbs within one language or from a cross-linguistic perspective. The objective is to understand the linguistic behaviour of the verbs and their inter-relationships within a contemporary cognitive-functional linguistic perspective. The languages represented include Irish, German, Slavic (West Slavic: Polish, Czech, Slovak and Sorbian and Western South Slavic: Slovenian and Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian), Germanic, Romance, Gan Chinese Yichun dialect, Māori, Bohairic Coptic, Shaowu Chinese, Hebrew, English, Lithuanian, Estonian, the Australian dialects Pitjantjatjara and Yankunytjatjara, Italian, and Persian. Topics discussed include argument structure and the encoding of arguments under causation, permission and transferverbs, their lexical semantics and event structure.