Released on 2005Categories History

African American Lives

African American Lives

Author: Clayborne Carson

Publisher: Pearson College Division

ISBN: STANFORD:36105126893630

Category: History

Page: 632

View: 733

African American Lives: The Struggle for Freedom uses a unique biographical approach to present the history of African Americans as active and thoughtful agents in the construction of their lives and communities. The text places African American lives and stories at the center of the narrative and as the basis of historical analysis. Each chapter opens with a vignette focusing on an individual involved in a dramatic moment or event. Personal stories are told throughout the narrative, as the lives and experiences of individuals provide the lens through which the story of African American history is viewed.
Released on 2017-10-17Categories Social Science

Archaeologies of African American Life in the Upper Mid-Atlantic

Archaeologies of African American Life in the Upper Mid-Atlantic

Author: Michael J. Gall

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 9780817319656

Category: Social Science

Page: 287

View: 595

A 2018 CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title New scholarship provides insights into the archaeology and cultural history of African American life from a collection of sites in the Mid-Atlantic This groundbreaking volume explores the archaeology of African American life and cultures in the Upper Mid-Atlantic region, using sites dating from the eighteenth through the twentieth centuries. Sites in Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York are all examined, highlighting the potential for historical archaeology to illuminate the often overlooked contributions and experiences of the region’s free and enslaved African American settlers. Archaeologies of African American Life in the Upper Mid-Atlantic brings together cutting-edge scholarship from both emerging and established scholars. Analyzing the research through sophisticated theoretical lenses and employing up-to-date methodologies, the essays reveal the diverse ways in which African Americans reacted to and resisted the challenges posed by life in a borderland between the North and South through the transition from slavery to freedom. In addition to extensive archival research, contributors synthesize the material finds of archaeological work in slave quarter sites, tenant farms, communities, and graveyards. Editors Michael J. Gall and Richard F. Veit have gathered new and nuanced perspectives on the important role free and enslaved African Americans played in the region’s cultural history. This collection provides scholars of the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast regions, African American studies, material culture studies, religious studies, slavery, the African diaspora, and historical archaeologists with a well-balanced array of rural archaeological sites that represent cultural traditions and developments among African Americans in the region. Collectively, these sites illustrate African Americans’ formation of fluid cultural and racial identities, communities, religious traditions, and modes of navigating complex cultural landscapes in the region under harsh and disenfranchising circumstances.
Released on 1998-08-01Categories History

African-American Life in Louisville

African-American Life in Louisville

Author: Bruce M. Tyler

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 0738553751

Category: History

Page: 132

View: 878

Louisville's African-American community dates back to the early 1800s. Before the 1850s, many Black churches such as the Quinn Chapel A.M.E. Church were founded in the area. Prominent African Americans, including Whitney M. Young, Woodford Porter, Frank Stanley, and Calvin Winstead, became Louisville's pioneer families in modern business and politics. Within the pages of this volume are many of the families who worked to become institution builders and leaders--in Louisville and around the world. African-American Life in Louisville covers the period from the late nineteenth century to the 1960s and focuses on the people and places in the Greater Louisville area, including Shelbyville. Author Bruce Tyler, Associate Professor of History at the University of Kentucky, Louisville, has created this unique collection of vintage photographs as a tribute to his community.
Released on 2011-11-01Categories History

African American Life in the Georgia Lowcountry

African American Life in the Georgia Lowcountry

Author: Philip Morgan

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820343075

Category: History

Page: 372

View: 578

The lush landscape and subtropical climate of the Georgia coast only enhance the air of mystery enveloping some of its inhabitants—people who owe, in some ways, as much to Africa as to America. As the ten previously unpublished essays in this volume examine various aspects of Georgia lowcountry life, they often engage a central dilemma: the region's physical and cultural remoteness helps to preserve the venerable ways of its black inhabitants, but it can also marginalize the vital place of lowcountry blacks in the Atlantic World. The essays, which range in coverage from the founding of the Georgia colony in the early 1700s through the present era, explore a range of topics, all within the larger context of the Atlantic world. Included are essays on the double-edged freedom that the American Revolution made possible to black women, the lowcountry as site of the largest gathering of African Muslims in early North America, and the coexisting worlds of Christianity and conjuring in coastal Georgia and the links (with variations) to African practices. A number of fascinating, memorable characters emerge, among them the defiant Mustapha Shaw, who felt entitled to land on Ossabaw Island and resisted its seizure by whites only to become embroiled in struggles with other blacks; Betty, the slave woman who, in the spirit of the American Revolution, presented a “list of grievances” to her master; and S'Quash, the Arabic-speaking Muslim who arrived on one of the last legal transatlantic slavers and became a head man on a North Carolina plantation. Published in association with the Georgia Humanities Council.
Released on 1998Categories History

African-American Life in DeKalb County, 1823-1970

African-American Life in DeKalb County, 1823-1970

Author: Herman Mason

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 0738500348

Category: History

Page: 132

View: 674

DeKalb County, Georgia, is much more than just another of the suburban areas around the city of Atlanta. African Americans have long lived, worked, played, and worshiped in the area. In African-American Life in DeKalb County: 1823-1970, Herman "Skip" Mason Jr., author, professor, and historian, has compiled a lovingly crafted look at the county's rich African-American heritage. With images from the Georgia Department of Archives and History, the DeKalb Historical Society, and his own extensive archives, Mason couples fascinating images with illuminating text to create a unique look at the area and its people. Within these pages, discover little-known facts about the county's past residents, including Bukumbo, the young girl who was brought from Africa to Decatur to serve as a nurse, who quickly became a beloved member of the family and died only a short while later. Learn about the great impact that the Clark and Oliver families had on Decatur, and view famous sections and landmarks of the county, including Lithonia, Ellenwood, Stone Mountain, Doraville, Tucker, Chamblee, Clarkston, Lynwood Park, Scottdale, and South DeKalb.
Released on 1991Categories Biography & Autobiography

Bearing Witness

Bearing Witness

Author: Henry Louis Gates (Jr.)

Publisher: Pantheon

ISBN: UOM:39015020822725

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 408

View: 330

A collection of memoirs written by Black scholars, politicians, creative writers, and journalists offers insight to the African-American experience in twentieth-century American society
Released on 2020-12-10Categories Literary Criticism

The American Novel After Ideology, 1961–2000

The American Novel After Ideology, 1961–2000

Author: Laurie Rodrigues

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9781501361876

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 232

View: 865

Claims of ideology's end are, on the one hand, performative denials of ideology's inability to end; while, on the other hand, paradoxically, they also reiterate an idea that 'ending' is simply what all ideologies eventually do. Situating her work around the intersecting publications of Daniel Bell's The End of Ideology (1960) and J.D. Salinger's Franny and Zooey (1961), Laurie Rodrigues argues that American novels express this paradox through nuanced applications of non-realist strategies, distorting realism in manners similar to ideology's distortions of reality, history, and belief. Reflecting the astonishing cultural variety of this period, The American Novel After Ideology, 1961 - 2000 examines Franny and Zooey, Carlene Hatcher Polite's The Flagellants (1967), Leslie Marmon Silko's Almanac of the Dead (1991), and Philip Roth's The Human Stain (2001) alongside the various discussions around ideology with which they intersect. Each novel's plotless narratives, dissolving subjectivities, and cultural codes organize the texts' peculiar relations to the post-ideological age, suggesting an aesthetic return of the repressed.
Released on 2004-09-30Categories History

Generations of Captivity

Generations of Captivity

Author: Ira Berlin

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674020839

Category: History

Page: 310

View: 416

Ira Berlin traces the history of African-American slavery in the United States from its beginnings in the seventeenth century to its fiery demise nearly three hundred years later. Most Americans, black and white, have a singular vision of slavery, one fixed in the mid-nineteenth century when most American slaves grew cotton, resided in the deep South, and subscribed to Christianity. Here, however, Berlin offers a dynamic vision, a major reinterpretation in which slaves and their owners continually renegotiated the terms of captivity. Slavery was thus made and remade by successive generations of Africans and African Americans who lived through settlement and adaptation, plantation life, economic transformations, revolution, forced migration, war, and ultimately, emancipation. Berlin's understanding of the processes that continually transformed the lives of slaves makes Generations of Captivity essential reading for anyone interested in the evolution of antebellum America. Connecting the Charter Generation to the development of Atlantic society in the seventeenth century, the Plantation Generation to the reconstruction of colonial society in the eighteenth century, the Revolutionary Generation to the Age of Revolutions, and the Migration Generation to American expansionism in the nineteenth century, Berlin integrates the history of slavery into the larger story of American life. He demonstrates how enslaved black people, by adapting to changing circumstances, prepared for the moment when they could seize liberty and declare themselves the Freedom Generation. This epic story, told by a master historian, provides a rich understanding of the experience of African-American slaves, an experience that continues to mobilize American thought and passions today.
Released on 2003-11-27Categories History

Africana

Africana

Author: Kwame Anthony Appiah

Publisher: Running Press

ISBN: 0762416424

Category: History

Page: 1200

View: 400

Drawn from the acclaimed landmark in reference publishing, this incomparable one-volume encyclopedia of the black world is now within reach of every family, student, and educator. It brings the entire Pan-African experience into sharp focus, with entries ranging from "affirmative action" to "zydeco," from each of the most prominent ethnic groups in Africa to each member of the Congressional Black Caucus. Africana will provide hours of reading pleasure through its longer, interpretive essays on the religion, arts, and cultural life of Africans and of black people everywhere.
Released on 1991Categories African Americans

Mule Bone

Mule Bone

Author: Langston Hughes

Publisher: Harper Perennial

ISBN: STANFORD:36105003757908

Category: African Americans

Page: 312

View: 900

Mule Bone is the only collaboration between Zora Neale Hurston and Langston Hughes, two stars of the Harlem Renaissance, and it holds an unparalleled place in the annals of African-American theater. Set in Eatonville, Florida--Hurston's hometown and the inspiration for much of her fiction--this energetic and often farcical play centers on Jim and Dave, a two-man song-and-dance team, and Daisy, the woman who comes between them. Overcome by jealousy, Jim hits Dave with a mule bone and hilarity follows chaos as the town splits into two factions: the Methodists, who want to pardon Jim; and the Baptists, who wish to banish him for his crime. Included in this edition is the fascinating account of the Mule Bone copyright dispute between Hurston and Hughes that ended their friendship and prevented the play from being performed until its debut production at the Lincoln Center Theater in New York City in 1991--sixty years after it was written. Also included is "The Bone of Contention," Hurston's short story on which the play was based; personal and often heated correspondence between the authors; and critical essays that illuminate the play and the dazzling period that came to be known as the Harlem Renaissance.