Released on 2015-01-20Categories Religion

Being Human in a Buddhist World

Being Human in a Buddhist World

Author: Janet Gyatso

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231538329

Category: Religion

Page: 544

View: 842

Critically exploring medical thought in a cultural milieu with no discernible influence from the European Enlightenment, Being Human in a Buddhist World reveals an otherwise unnoticed intersection of early modern sensibilities and religious values in traditional Tibetan medicine. It further studies the adaptation of Buddhist concepts and values to medical concerns and suggests important dimensions of Buddhism's role in the development of Asian and global civilization. Through its unique focus and sophisticated reading of source materials, Being Human adds a crucial chapter in the larger historiography of science and religion. The book opens with the bold achievements in Tibetan medical illustration, commentary, and institution building during the period of the Fifth Dalai Lama and his regent, Desi Sangye Gyatso, then looks back to the work of earlier thinkers, tracing a strategically astute dialectic between scriptural and empirical authority on questions of history and the nature of human anatomy. It follows key differences between medicine and Buddhism in attitudes toward gender and sex and the moral character of the physician, who had to serve both the patient's and the practitioner's well-being. Being Human in a Buddhist World ultimately finds that Tibetan medical scholars absorbed ethical and epistemological categories from Buddhism yet shied away from ideal systems and absolutes, instead embracing the imperfectability of the human condition.
Released on 2016-02-09Categories Social Science

Asian Highland Perspectives 40

Asian Highland Perspectives 40

Author: various

Publisher: ASIAN HIGHLANDS PERSPECTIVES

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 550

View: 815

Volume 40 features research articles on Tibetan mountain deities, Mongghul ritual, material culture in Ladakh, Tibetan ritual practitioners, Tibetan naming practices, and lifestyle migration in Dali. The volume also has two folklore contributions and twenty-one book reviews. Editor's Note Articles Tsering Bum. "THE CHANGING ROLES OF TIBETAN MOUNTAIN DEITIES IN THE CONTEXT OF EMERGING ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES: DKAR PO LHA BSHAM IN YUL SHUL" Limusishiden (Li Dechun) and Gerald Roche. "SOCIALIZING WITH GODS IN THE MONGGHULBOG RITUAL" Jacqueline H. Fewes and Abdul Nasir Khan. "MANUSCRIPTS, MATERIAL CULTURE, AND EPHEMERA OF THE SILK ROUTE: ARTIFACTS OF EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY LADAKHITRADE BETWEEN CENTRAL AND SOUTH ASIA" Libu Lakhi (Li Jianfu). "NAMUYI TIBETAN pha54 tsә54 RITUALS AND ORAL CHANTS" Duojiezhaxi (Dorje Tashi, Rdo rje bkra shis) and CK Stuart. "A MDO TIBETAN NAMING PRACTICES AND NAME POPULARITY" Gary Sigley. "THE MOUNTAIN CHANGERS: LIFESTYLE MIGRATION IN SOUTHWEST CHINA" Folklore Timothy Thurston and Caixiangduojie. "An A mdo Tibetan Wedding Speech from Ne'u na Village" Bkra shis bzang po. "Oral Narratives from Bang smad: Deities, Demons, Bla ma, and Leaders Reviews Bettina Zeisler. Mountains, Monasteries, and Mosques Barbara Gerke. The Social Life of Tibetan Biography Francesca Fiaschetti. China's Encounters on the South and Southwest Francesca Fiaschetti. Inner Asia, and the Spatial Politics of Empire: Archaeology, Mobility, and Culture Contact M. Alyson Prude. Pilgrim of the Clear Light Sienna Craig. At Home in the World Tristan G. Brown. China From Empire to Nation-State Robert Entenmann. In the Land of the Eastern Queendom: The Politics of Gender and Ethnicity on the Sino-Tibetan Frontier. Jonathan Z. Ludwig The Emperor Far Away: Travels at the Edge of China Jonathan Z. Ludwig. India-China Borderlands: Conversations Beyond the Centre Tricia Kehoe. Ethnicity in China; A Critical Introduction Hilary Howes. Towards Sustainable Use of Rangelands in North-West China Lei Duan. War Finance and Logistics in Late Imperial China Magnus Fiskesjö. Chieftains into Ancestors Nikolas Broy. The Origins of Religious Violence Kali Cape. Eminent Buddhist Women Andrew Nelson. The Brave New World of Ethnicity in Nepal Christine Murphy. The Unbearable Dreamworld of Champa the Driver Enrico Beltramini. Healing Traditions of the Northwestern Himalayas and Being Human in a Buddhist World Katia Buffetrille. Mapping Shangrila Christine Murphy. Tibetan Folktales (World Folklore Series)
Released on 2022Categories Buddhism

The Oxford Handbook of Buddhist Practice

The Oxford Handbook of Buddhist Practice

Author: Kevin Trainor

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190632922

Category: Buddhism

Page: 688

View: 117

"This Handbook provides a state-of-the-art exploration of several key dynamics in current studies of the Buddhist tradition with a focus on practice. Embodiment, materiality, emotion, and gender shape the way most Buddhists engage with their traditions, in contrast to popular representations of Buddhism as spiritual, disembodied, and largely devoid of ritual. This volume highlights how practice often represents a fluid, dynamic, and strategic means of defining identity and negotiating the challenges of everyday life. Essays explore the transformational aims of practices that require practitioners to move, gesture, and emote in prescribed ways, including the ways that scholars' own embodied practices are integral to their research methodology. The chapters are written by acknowledged experts in their respective subject areas and taken together offer an overview of current thinking in the field. The volume is of particular value to scholars who seek an orientation to current perspectives on important conceptual, theoretical, and methodological concerns that are shaping the field in areas outside their primary expertise. The inclusion of substantial, up-to-date bibliographies also makes the volume an important guide to current scholarship"--
Released on 2005-06-30Categories Philosophy

Being Benevolence

Being Benevolence

Author: Sallie B. King

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN: 0824829352

Category: Philosophy

Page: 312

View: 581

Engaged Buddhism is the contemporary movement of nonviolent social and political activism found throughout the Buddhist world. Its ethical theory sees the world in terms of cause and effect, a view that discourages its practitioners from becoming adversaries, blaming or condemning the other. Its leaders make some of the most important contributions in the Buddhist world to thinking about issues in political theory, human rights, nonviolence, and social justice. Being Benevolence provides for the first time a rich overview of the main ideas and arguments of prominent Engaged Buddhist thinkers and activists on a variety of questions: What kind of political system should modern Asian states have? What are the pros and cons of Western "liberalism"? Can Buddhism support the idea of human rights? Can there ever be a nonviolent nation-state? It identifies the roots of Engaged Buddhist social ethics in such traditional Buddhist concepts and practices as interdependence, compassion, and meditation, and shows how these are applied to particular social and political issues. It illuminates the movement’s metaphysical views on the individual and society and goes on to examine how Engaged Buddhists respond to fundamental questions in political theory concerning the proper balance between the individual and society. The second half of the volume focuses on applied social-political issues: human rights, nonviolence, and social justice.
Released on 2016-09-01Categories Religion

What Is Buddhist Enlightenment?

What Is Buddhist Enlightenment?

Author: Dale S. Wright

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190622602

Category: Religion

Page: 288

View: 492

What kind of person should I strive to be? What ideals should I pursue in my life? These basic human questions and others like them are components of the overall question that guides this book: What is enlightenment? As Dale Wright argues, any serious practitioner of human life, religious or not, confronts the challenge of living an authentic life, of overcoming common human disabilities like greed, hatred, and delusion that give rise to excessive suffering. Why then, Wright asks, is this essential question often avoided, even discouraged among Buddhists? One reason frequently cited by Buddhists is that pondering a distant goal might be a waste of energy that would be better applied to practice: Quiet the flow of obsessive thinking, put yourself in a mindful state of presence, and let enlightenment take care of itself. In this book, however, Wright contends that pondering this question is meditative practice--that attentive inquiry of this kind is essential as the starting point and guide for any mindful practice of life. Meditative reflection on the meaning of enlightenment focuses us on our aim and direction in life. It guides us in shaping our practices, our ideals, and the kinds of lives we will live. Asking what enlightenment is as a basic form of meditation helps to activate our lives and get transformative practice underway. From Wright's perspective, there is no more important question to ask than this one. What is Buddhist Enlightenment? offers a wide-ranging exploration of issues that have a bearing on the contemporary meaning of enlightenment, including a concluding section with 10 theses that answer the title's question. Written by a leading scholar of Buddhism, the book balances deep learning and an accessible style, offering valuable insights for students, scholars, and practitioners alike. While he takes an examination of what enlightenment has been in past Buddhist traditions as his point of departure, Wright's historical considerations yield to the question that our lives press upon us--what kinds of lives should we aspire to live here, now, and into the future?
Released on 2006Categories Religion

Communicating Christ in the Buddhist World

Communicating Christ in the Buddhist World

Author: David S. Lim

Publisher: William Carey Library

ISBN: 0878085106

Category: Religion

Page: 280

View: 610

This is the fourth and latest volume in the Buddhist World series which includes Sharing Jesus in the Buddhist World, Sharing Jesus Holistically with the Buddhist World, and Sharing Jesus Effectively in the Buddhist World. Compiled from papers presented at the annual SEANET Missiological Forum in Thailand, Communicating Christ in the Buddhist World delivers fresh insights from mission theologians and practitioners. The first four chapters reflect on the theological framework by which Christians can fulfill the biblical mandate to evangelize and transform peoples. The next five chapters consider the significant sociological issues that have arisen in the Christian encounter with Buddhist peoples. The final three suggest some strategic ways forward for effective evangelism in the Buddhist world. May this book challenge the international Christian community to find better ways of relating to and approaching people of other faiths!
Released on 2005Categories Social Science

Women in Tibet

Women in Tibet

Author: Janet Gyatso

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231130988

Category: Social Science

Page: 456

View: 976

Collection of historical, literary, ethographical essays about the history - Women in traditional Tibet - and present situation of women in Tibet - Modern Tibetan Women, offering data and reflection on certain topics, like the lives of individual women. Based on texts, anthropological data, literature, newspaper articles, fieldwork and oral history.
Released on 2005-06-30Categories Philosophy

Being Benevolence

Being Benevolence

Author: Sallie B. King

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN: 9780824828646

Category: Philosophy

Page: 314

View: 469

Engaged Buddhism is the contemporary movement of nonviolent social and political activism found throughout the Buddhist world. Its ethical theory sees the world in terms of cause and effect, a view that discourages its practitioners from becoming adversaries, blaming or condemning the other. Its leaders make some of the most important contributions in the Buddhist world to thinking about issues in political theory, human rights, nonviolence, and social justice. Being Benevolence provides for the first time a rich overview of the main ideas and arguments of prominent Engaged Buddhist thinkers and activists on a variety of questions: What kind of political system should modern Asian states have? What are the pros and cons of Western "liberalism"? Can Buddhism support the idea of human rights? Can there ever be a nonviolent nation-state? It identifies the roots of Engaged Buddhist social ethics in such traditional Buddhist concepts and practices as interdependence, compassion, and meditation, and shows how these are applied to particular social and political issues. It illuminates the movement’s metaphysical views on the individual and society and goes on to examine how Engaged Buddhists respond to fundamental questions in political theory concerning the proper balance between the individual and society. The second half of the volume focuses on applied social-political issues: human rights, nonviolence, and social justice.
Released on 2001-05-26Categories Nature

Being Human

Being Human

Author: Anna L. Peterson

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520226555

Category: Nature

Page: 289

View: 423

"[Being Human] is one of the few books that begins to integrate theological narratives with scientific ones, looking for a compelling correlation between them where modern and religious sensibilities might both be affirmed. This is a unique work."—Bron Taylor, Professor and Director of Environmental Studies, University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh, and author of Ecological Resistance Movements: The Global Emergence of Radical and Popular Environmentalism. "Being Human succeeds at accounting for people's conception of humaness and human's relationship with nature—no easy task, but one that is a crucial starting point for any discussion of environmental ethics."—Kay Read, Associate Professor of Comparative Ethics and Native American Religions, DePaul University, and author of Time and Sacrifice in the Aztec Cosmos "Anna Peterson's Being Human is a stellar work of integration. Peterson argues that the ideology of human exceptionalism and disconnection from the rest of nature is a major source of social and ecological harm. She draws together cultural constructionist, Asian, Native American, feminist and evolutionary thought to present a view of the human as both an integral part of nature and a creator of culture, called to develop an ethic of interrelationality for the sake of the wellbeing of the whole earth community."—Rosemary Radford Ruether, Garrett Theological Center, author of Gaia and God: An Ecofeminist Theology of Earth Healing. "In the postmodern academic climate of slice-and-dice, take-no-prisoners 'analysis,' and 'critical theory,' Anna Peterson's book is a welcome breath of fresh air. She positions her discussion as a development of—rather than a deconstructive triumph over—earlier work in the field of environmental philosophy. Peterson takes up the themes that are absolutely central to the field—the nature of nature, human nature, and the appropriate relationship between the two. Her conclusions are well-informed, well-reasoned, reasonable, and last but not least, beautifully and engagingly expressed."—Baird Callicott, Professor of Philosophy and Religion Studies, University of North Texas, and author of Earth's Insights: A Multicultural Survey of Ecological Ethics from the Mediterranean Basin to the Australian Outback (California, 1997), In Defense of the Land: Essays in Environmental Philosophy, and Beyond the Land Ethic: More Essays in Environmental Philosophy. "Peterson challenges us to think critically about the ideas about nature and humanity that shape our ethical behavior. She also brings into critical dialogue insights from a wide variety of religious traditions—Buddhist, Taoist, Navaho, Koyukon, Catholic and Protestant. Peterson helps us think creatively and critically about the task of comparative ethics, and the imperatives of environmental ethics. This book is a must-read for any one concerned with environmental ethics and with comparative ethics."—Sharon Welch, Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Missouri-Columbia, and author of A Feminist Ethic of Risk, Sweet Dreams in America: Making Ethics and Spirituality Work, and Communities of Resistance and Solidarity: A Feminist Theology of LIberation.
Released on 2004Categories

Buddhism and the Earth

Buddhism and the Earth

Author: Tara E. Sieg

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:1243913938

Category:

Page:

View: 111

Introduction Fundamental to the philosophy of Buddhism, is the insight that there is "unsatisfactohness" (dukkha) in the world and that it can be eliminated through the practice of the Noble Eight Fold Path. Buddhism also maintains that the world as we experience and entities that exist are bereft of any substantiality. Instead existence is manifest through dependent origination. All things are conditional; nothing is permanent. However, inherent in this dependent existence is the interconnectedness of all beings and their subjection to the cosmic law of karma. Part of cultivating the Eight Fold path includes a deep compassion for all other living things, 'trapped' within this cycle of dependent origination. This compassion or empathy (karuna) is crucial to the Buddhist path to enlightenment. It is this emphasis on karuna that shows itself in Mahayana Buddhism with respect to the theory of the boddhisatva (or Buddha-to-be) since the boddhisatva willingly postpones his/her own enlightenment to help others on the same path. One of the ramifications of the theory of dependent origination is that there is no anthropocentric bias placed on humans over the natural world. Paradoxically the doctrine of non-self becomes an ontology within Buddhism, culminating in the Mayahana realization that a common boundary exists between samsara and nirvana. Essential to this ontology is the life of dharma or a moral life. Ethics is not separated from ontology. As my thesis will show, this basic outlook of Buddhism has implications toward our understanding of the Buddhist world-view with respect to the current human predicament concerning the environment. While humans are the only ones who can 4 attain "Buddhahood", it is because of our ability to understand what it means to follow the Eight fold path and act accordingly. Because of the interconnectedness of all entities {dharmas), there is an ontological necessity to eliminate suffering and 'save the earth' because if we allow the earth to suffer, we ALL suffer. This can be understood as an ethical outlook which can be applied to our interaction with and treatment of the natural environment or environment in the broadest sense, not just trees plants rocks etc. It is an approach to samsara and all within it. It has been argued that there is no ontology in Buddhism due to its doctrine of "non-self". However, it is a goal of this thesis to argue that there does exist an original ontology in Buddhism; that according to it, the nature of Being is essentially neither "Being nor non-being nor not non-being" as illustrated by Nagarjuna. Within this ontology is engrained an ethic or 'right path' (samma marga) that is fundamental to our being and this includes a compassionate relationship to our environment. In this dissertation I endeavour to trace the implications that the Buddhist worldview has for the environmental issues that assail us in our age of technology. I will explore questions such as: can the Buddhist way of thinking help us comprehend and possibly resolve the environmental problems of our day and age? Are there any current environmental theories which are comparable to or share common ground with the classical Buddhist doctrines? I will elucidate some fundamental doctrines of early Buddhism from an environmental perspective as well as identify some comparable modern environmental theories such as deep ecology and general systems theory, that seem to share in the wisdom of classical Buddhism and have much to gain from a deeper appreciation of Buddhism.