Released on 2008-12-18Categories History

British Literature of the Blitz

British Literature of the Blitz

Author: K. Miller

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230234321

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 434

British Literature of the Blitz interrogates the patriotic, utopian ideal of the People's War by analyzing conflicted representations of class and gender in literature and film. Its subtitle – Fighting the People's War – describes how British citizens both united to fight Nazi Germany and questioned the nationalist ideology binding them together.
Released on 2020-05-14Categories Literary Criticism

British Literature and Culture in Second World Wartime

British Literature and Culture in Second World Wartime

Author: Beryl Pong

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192577658

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 308

View: 279

British Literature and Culture in Second World Wartime excavates British late modernism's relationship to war in terms of chronophobia: a joint fear of the past and future. As a wartime between, but distinct from, those of the First World War and the Cold War, Second World wartime involves an anxiety that is both repetition and imaginary: both a dread of past violence unleashed anew, and that of a future violence still ungraspable. Identifying a constellation of temporalities and affects under three tropes—time capsules, time zones, and ruins—this volume contends that Second World wartime is a pivotal moment when wartime surpassed the boundaries of a specific state of emergency, becoming first routine and then open-ended. It offers a synoptic, wide-ranging look at writers on the home front, including Henry Green, Elizabeth Bowen, Virginia Woolf, and Rose Macaulay, through a variety of genres, such as life-writing, the novel, and the short story. It also considers an array of cultural and archival material from photographers such as Cecil Beaton, filmmakers such as Charles Crichton, and artists such as John Minton. It shows how figures harnessed or exploited their media's temporal properties to formally register the distinctiveness of this wartime through a complex feedback between anticipation and retrospection, oftentimes fashioning the war as a memory, even while it was taking place. While offering a strong foundation for new readers of the mid-century, the book's overall theoretical focus on chronophobia will be an important intervention for those already working in the field.
Released on 2020Categories Literary Criticism

British Women's Writing, 1930 to 1960

British Women's Writing, 1930 to 1960

Author: Sue Kennedy

Publisher: Liverpool English Texts and St

ISBN: 9781789621822

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 627

This volume contributes to the vibrant, ongoing recuperative work on women's writing by shedding new light on a group of authors commonly dismissed as middlebrow in their concerns and conservative in their styles and politics. The neologism 'interfeminism' - coined to partner Kristin Bluemel's 'intermodernism' - locates this group chronologically and ideologically between two 'waves' of feminism, whilst also forging connections between the political and cultural monoliths that have traditionally overshadowed them. Drawing attention to the strengths of this 'out-of-category' writing in its own right, this volume also highlights how intersecting discourses of gender, class and society in the interwar and post-war periods pave the way for the bold reassessments of female subjectivity that characterise second and third wave feminism. The essays showcase the stylistic, cultural and political vitality of a substantial group of women authors of fiction, non-fiction, drama, poetry and journalism including Vera Brittain, Storm Jameson, Nancy Mitford, Phyllis Shand Allfrey, Rumer Godden, Attia Hosain, Doris Lessing, Kamala Markandaya, Susan Ertz, Marghanita Laski, Elizabeth Bowen, Edith Pargeter, Eileen Bigland, Nancy Spain, Vera Laughton Matthews, Pamela Hansford Johnson, Dorothy Whipple, Elizabeth Taylor, Daphne du Maurier, Barbara Comyns, Shelagh Delaney, Stevie Smith and Penelope Mortimer. Additional exploration of the popular magazines Woman's Weekly and Good Housekeeping and new material from the Vera Brittain archive add an innovative dimension to original readings of the literature of a transformative period of British social and cultural history.
Released on 2004Categories Literary Criticism

The Cambridge History of Twentieth-Century English Literature

The Cambridge History of Twentieth-Century English Literature

Author: Laura Marcus

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521820774

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 886

View: 422

This new Cambridge History is the first major history of twentieth-century English literature to cover the full range of writing in England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland. The volume also explores the impact of writing from the former colonies on English literature of the period and analyses the ways in which conventional literary genres were shaped and inflected by the new cultural technologies of radio, cinema and television. In providing an authoritative narrative of literary and cultural production across the century, this History acknowledges the claims for innovation and modernisation that characterise the beginning of the period. At the same time, it attends analytically to the more profound patterns of continuity and development which avant-garde tendencies characteristically underplay.
Released on 2017-11-06Categories Literary Criticism

Reading London in Wartime

Reading London in Wartime

Author: William Cederwell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351239042

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 220

View: 634

Reading London in Wartime: Blitz, the People and Propaganda in 1940s Literature presents an expansive variety of writers and genres, including non-fiction and film approaches, to build a comprehensive social picture of the atmosphere during wartime London. From blitz and austerity to the nagging insistency of propaganda, this volume examines the representation of London in wartime and early post-war literature through each writer’s unique perspective on the pressures of 1940s city life. Exploring the use of London imagery, this book considers how literature redirects attention to individual, subjective experience at a time of enforced co-operation, uniformity and community. Unlike government information films and news broadcasts, which often used London to prop up prevailing clichés and stereotypes, and encouraged patriotic support for the war, literature had the freedom to express more recalcitrant truths. London writing of the 1940s was not a literature of opposition or dissent, but in offering more nuanced depictions of the period, it was a counterweight to propaganda and the general war temperament. In writing, the city becomes a more complex place, no longer the easy symbol of defiance and stoicism, of the shared sacrifice of ration book and war work.
Released on 2006-07-31Categories Literary Collections

The Broadview Anthology of British Literature Volume 6: The Twentieth Century and Beyond

The Broadview Anthology of British Literature Volume 6: The Twentieth Century and Beyond

Author: Joseph Black

Publisher: Broadview Press

ISBN: 9781551116143

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 1124

View: 966

In all six of its volumes The Broadview Anthology of British Literature presents British literature in a truly distinctive light. Fully grounded in sound literary and historical scholarship, the anthology takes a fresh approach to many canonical authors, and includes a wide selection of work by lesser-known writers. The anthology also provides wide-ranging coverage of the worldwide connections of British literature, and it pays attention throughout to issues of race, gender, class, and sexual orientation. It includes comprehensive introductions to each period, providing in each case an overview of the historical and cultural as well as the literary background. It features accessible and engaging headnotes for all authors, extensive explanatory annotations throughout, and an unparalleled number of illustrations and contextual materials, offering additional perspectives both on individual texts and on larger social and cultural developments. Innovative, authoritative, and comprehensive, The Broadview Anthology of British Literature embodies a consistently fresh approach to the study of literature and literary history. The full Broadview Anthology of British Literature comprises six bound volumes, together with an extensive website component; the latter has been edited, annotated, and designed according to the same high standards as the bound book component of the anthology, and is accessible through the broadviewpress.come website by using the passcode obtained with the purchase of one or more of the bound volumes. Highlights of Volume 6: The Twentieth Century and Beyond include: Joseph Conrad’s “The Secret Sharer,” “An Outpost of Progress,” an essay on the Titanic, and a substantial range of background materials, including documents on the exploitation of central Africa that set “An Outpost of Progress” in vivid context; and a large selection of late twentieth and early twenty-first century writers such as Ian McEwan, Kazuo Ishiguro, and Zadie Smith. For the convenience of those whose focus does not extend to the full period covered in the Volume 6: The Twentieth Century and Beyond, that volume is now available either in its original one-volume format or in this alternative two-volume format, with Volume 6a (The Early Twentieth Century) extending to the end of WWII, and Volume 6b (The Late Twentieth Century and Beyond) covering from WWII into the present century. Please see the Volume 6 Table of Contents for the exact location of the split.
Released on 2012-08-07Categories Literary Criticism

The Return of England in English Literature

The Return of England in English Literature

Author: M. Gardiner

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137026026

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 211

View: 439

This lively study provides an account of the 'fall and rise' of the English nation within the British discipline of English Literature between the late eighteenth century and the present day, offering a reconceptualisation of the relationship between English Literature and the formation of English cultural identity.
Released on 2013Categories History

The Routledge Concise History of Twentieth-century British Literature

The Routledge Concise History of Twentieth-century British Literature

Author: Ashley Dawson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780415572453

Category: History

Page: 211

View: 758

In The Routledge Concise History of Twentieth-Century British Literature Ashley Dawson identifies the key British writers and texts, shaped by era-defining cultural and historical events and movements from the period. He provides: Analysis of works by a diverse range of influential authors Examination of the cultural and literary impact of crucial historical, social, political and cultural events Discussion of Britain's imperial status in the century and the diversification of the nation through Black and Asian British Literature Readers are also provided with a comprehensive timeline, a glossary of terms, further reading and explanatory text boxes featuring further information on key figures and events.