Released on 2009-05-18Categories Religion

The Myth of a Christian Nation

The Myth of a Christian Nation

Author: Gregory A. Boyd

Publisher: Zondervan

ISBN: 9780310565918

Category: Religion

Page: 224

View: 350

The church was established to serve the world with Christ-like love, not to rule the world. It is called to look like a corporate Jesus, dying on the cross for those who crucified him, not a religious version of Caesar. It is called to manifest the kingdom of the cross in contrast to the kingdom of the sword. Whenever the church has succeeded in gaining what most American evangelicals are now trying to get – political power – it has been disastrous both for the church and the culture. Whenever the church picks up the sword, it lays down the cross. The present activity of the religious right is destroying the heart and soul of the evangelical church and destroying its unique witness to the world. The church is to have a political voice, but we are to have it the way Jesus had it: by manifesting an alternative to the political, “power over,” way of doing life. We are to transform the world by being willing to suffer for others – exercising “power under,” not by getting our way in society – exercising “power over.”
Released on 2005-04-10Categories Religion

What If America Were a Christian Nation Again?

What If America Were a Christian Nation Again?

Author: D. James Kennedy

Publisher: Thomas Nelson

ISBN: 9781418529796

Category: Religion

Page: 272

View: 861

Some people would gnash their teeth at the idea that America was – and can be again – a Christian nation. They will not be satisfied until they have removed every vestige of our Christian heritage from our minds and from our surroundings. Yet in this book, D. James Kennedy and Jerry Newcombe document the incontrovertible fact that America began as a Christian nation. And "we can get back on track before it's too late," they say. "What made us great in the first place is our rich Christian heritage. It's time to reclaim America!"
Released on 2014-12-18Categories Religion

Myth and the Christian Nation

Myth and the Christian Nation

Author: Burton L. Mack

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317490586

Category: Religion

Page: 224

View: 804

America is widely regarded as the ultimate "Christian Nation." Religious language has always been at the forefront of American politics but this has increased since the events of 9/11. 'Myth and the Christian Nation' presents a startling analysis of how and why Christianity and national identity have been woven together in recent American political discourse. Drawing on examples of religious myth-making across the ancient world 'Myth and the Christian Nation' brings the weight of history to bear on America today, a place where myth, monotheism, sovereignty and power can be harnessed together in the service of specific interests. The book invites readers to rethink the role of religion in the construction of social democracy and to see America afresh.
Released on 2011Categories Religion

Was America Founded as a Christian Nation?

Was America Founded as a Christian Nation?

Author: John Fea

Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press

ISBN: 9780664235048

Category: Religion

Page: 287

View: 280

Presents a historical overview of the relationship between the United States and Christianity and an analysis of the beliefs of such figures as Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, and George Washington.
Released on 2013-07-01Categories Fiction

Christian Nation: A Novel

Christian Nation: A Novel

Author: Frederic C. Rich

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393240344

Category: Fiction

Page: 352

View: 510

“They said what they would do, and we did not listen. Then they did what they said they would do.” So ends the first chapter of this brilliantly readable counterfactual novel, reminding us that America’s Christian fundamentalists have been consistently clear about their vision for a "Christian Nation" and dead serious about acquiring the political power to achieve it. When President McCain dies and Sarah Palin becomes president, the reader, along with the nation, stumbles down a terrifyingly credible path toward theocracy, realizing too late that the Christian right meant precisely what it said. In the spirit of Philip Roth’s The Plot Against America, one of America’s foremost lawyers lays out in chilling detail what such a future might look like: constitutional protections dismantled; all aspects of life dominated by an authoritarian law called “The Blessing,” enforced by a totally integrated digital world known as the "Purity Web." Readers will find themselves haunted by the questions the narrator struggles to answer in this fictional memoir: "What happened, why did it happen, how could it have happened?"
Released on 2011-07-11Categories Biography & Autobiography

Citizens of a Christian Nation

Citizens of a Christian Nation

Author: Derek Chang

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812205954

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 248

View: 303

In America after the Civil War, the emancipation of four million slaves and the explosion of Chinese immigration fundamentally challenged traditional ideas about who belonged in the national polity. As Americans struggled to redefine citizenship in the United States, the "Negro Problem" and the "Chinese Question" dominated the debate. During this turbulent period, which witnessed the Supreme Court's Plessy v. Ferguson decision and passage of the Chinese Exclusion Act, among other restrictive measures, American Baptists promoted religion instead of race as the primary marker of citizenship. Through its domestic missionary wing, the American Baptist Home Missionary Society, Baptists ministered to former slaves in the South and Chinese immigrants on the Pacific coast. Espousing an ideology of evangelical nationalism, in which the country would be united around Christianity rather than a particular race or creed, Baptists advocated inclusion of Chinese and African Americans in the national polity. Their hope for a Christian nation hinged on the social transformation of these two groups through spiritual and educational uplift. By 1900, the Society had helped establish important institutions that are still active today, including the Chinese Baptist Church and many historically black colleges and universities. Citizens of a Christian Nation chronicles the intertwined lives of African Americans, Chinese Americans, and the white missionaries who ministered to them. It traces the radical, religious, and nationalist ideology of the domestic mission movement, examining both the opportunities provided by the egalitarian tradition of evangelical Christianity and the limits imposed by its assumptions of cultural difference. The book further explores how blacks and Chinese reimagined the evangelical nationalist project to suit their own needs and hopes. Historian Derek Chang brings together for the first time African American and Chinese American religious histories through a multitiered local, regional, national, and even transnational analysis of race, nationalism, and evangelical thought and practice.
Released on 2000-04-13Categories Religion

Christian America?

Christian America?

Author: Christian Smith

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520929055

Category: Religion

Page: 267

View: 720

In recent decades Protestant evangelicalism has become a conspicuous and--to many Americans, worrisome--part of this country's cultural and political landscape. But just how unified is the supposed constituency of the Christian Coalition? And who exactly are the people the Christian Right claims to represent? In the most extensive study of American evangelicals ever conducted, Christian Smith explores the beliefs, values, commitments, and goals of the ordinary men and women who make up this often misunderstood religious group. The result is a much-needed contribution to the discussion of issues surrounding fundamental American freedoms and the basic identity of the United States as a pluralistic nation. Based on data from a three-year national study, including more than 200 in-depth interviews of evangelicals around the country, Christian America? assesses the common stereotype of evangelicals as intolerant, right-wing, religious zealots seeking to impose a Christian moral order through political force. What Smith finds instead are people vastly more diverse and ambivalent than this stereotype suggests. On issues such as religion in education, "family values," Christian political activism, and tolerance of other religions and moralities, evangelicals are highly disparate and conflicted. As the voices of interviewees make clear, the labels "conservative" and "liberal" are too simplistic for understanding their approaches to public life and political action.