Released on 2000Categories Literary Criticism

Friendly Fire

Friendly Fire

Author: Katherine Kinney

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780195141962

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 232

View: 685

Kinney explores the intersections of culture, literature, and history surrouding the Vietnam "conflict," about which hundreds of plays, novels, short stories, and memoirs have been written. The cultural and social implications from these evocative films and popular fictions shaped the American landsape with thoughts on what the war really meant to American culture.
Released on 2000-10-09Categories Literary Criticism

Friendly Fire : American Images of the Vietnam War

Friendly Fire : American Images of the Vietnam War

Author: Riverside Katherine Kinney Associate Professor of English University of California

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195349627

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 234

View: 284

Hundreds of memoirs, novels, plays, and movies have been devoted to the American war in Vietnam. In spite of the great variety of mediums, political perspectives and the degrees of seriousness with which the war has been treated, Katherine Kinney argues that the vast majority of these works share a single story: that of Americans killing Americans in Vietnam. Friendly Fire, in this instance, refers not merely to a tragic error of war, it also refers to America's war with itself during the Vietnam years. Starting from this point, this book considers the concept of "friendly fire" from multiple vantage points, and portrays the Vietnam age as a crucible where America's cohesive image of itself is shattered--pitting soldiers against superiors, doves against hawks, feminism against patriarchy, racial fear against racial tolerance. Through the use of extensive evidence from the film and popular fiction of Vietnam (i.e. Kovic's Born on the Fourth of July, Didion's Democracy, O'Brien's Going After Cacciato, Rabe's Sticks and Bones and Streamers), Kinney draws a powerful picture of a nation politically, culturally, and socially divided, and a war that has been memorialized as a contested site of art, media, politics, and ideology.
Released on 2008Categories History

The War That Never Ends: New Perspectives on the Vietnam War

The War That Never Ends: New Perspectives on the Vietnam War

Author: David L. Anderson, John Ernst

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 9780813127309

Category: History

Page: 378

View: 516

More than three decades after the withdrawal of American troops from Southeast Asia, the Vietnam War still resonates in political and cultural discourse and still motivates vibrant historical inquiry. [In this book, the editors] present the newest perspectives on the war in Vietnam, from the homefront to Ho Chi Minh City, from the government halls to the hotbeds of activist opposition. The seventeen essays compiled by David L. Anderson and John Ernst examine Vietnamese as well as American experiences of the grueling conflict, breaking new ground on questions relating to gender, religion, ideology, media, and public opinion. The [book] sheds new light on the evolving historical meanings of the Vietnam War, its enduring impact, and its potential to influence future political and military decision-making, in times of peace as well as war.-Dust jacket.
Released on 2000-11-02Categories Literary Criticism

Friendly Fire

Friendly Fire

Author: Katherine Kinney

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198027583

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 232

View: 229

Hundreds of memoirs, novels, plays, and movies have been devoted to the American war in Vietnam. In spite of the great variety of media, political perspectives and the degrees of seriousness with which the war has been treated, Katherine Kinney argues that the vast majority of these works share a single story: that of Americans killing Americans in Vietnam. Friendly Fire, in this instance, refers not merely to a tragic error of war, it also refers to America's war with itself during the Vietnam years. Starting from this point, this book considers the concept of "friendly fire" from multiple vantage points, and portrays the Vietnam age as a crucible where America's cohesive image of itself is shattered--pitting soldiers against superiors, doves against hawks, feminism against patriarchy, racial fear against racial tolerance. Through the use of extensive evidence from the film and popular fiction of Vietnam (e.g. Kovic's Born on the Fourth of July, Didion's Democracy, O'Brien's Going After Cacciato, Rabe's Sticks and Bones and Streamers), Kinney draws a powerful picture of a nation politically, culturally, and socially divided, and a war that has been memorialized as a contested site of art, media, politics, and ideology.
Released on 2017-04-21Categories Literary Criticism

Friendly Fire in the Literature of War

Friendly Fire in the Literature of War

Author: Earl R. Anderson

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9781476628189

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 232

View: 821

The term “friendly fire” was coined in the 1970s but the theme appears in literature from ancient times to the present. It begins the narrative in Aeschylus’s Persians and Larry Heinemann’s Paco’s Story. It marks the turning point in Homer’s Iliad, Virgil’s Aeneid, the Chanson de Roland, Stephen Crane’s The Red Badge of Courage and Tim O’Brien’s Going After Cacciato. It is the subject of transformative disclosure in Jaan Kross’s Czar’s Madman, Ron Kovic’s Born on the Fourth of July, O’Brien’s In the Lake of the Woods and A.B. Yehoshua’s Friendly Fire. In some stories, events propel the characters into a friendly-fire catastrophe, as in Thomas Taylor’s A Piece of this Country and Oliver Stone’s 1986 film Platoon. This study examines friendly fire in a broad range of literary contexts.
Released on 2016-05-10Categories History

Friendly Fire

Friendly Fire

Author: C. D. B. Bryan

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 9781504034791

Category: History

Page: 437

View: 599

The true story of Michael Mullen, a soldier killed in Vietnam, and his parents’ quest for the truth from the US government: “Brilliantly done” (The Boston Globe). Drafted into the US Army, Michael Mullen left his family’s Iowa farm in September 1969 to fight for his country in Vietnam. Six months later, he returned home in a casket. Michael wasn’t killed by the North Vietnamese, but by artillery fire from friendly forces. With the government failing to provide the precise circumstances of his death, Mullen’s devastated parents, Peg and Gene, demanded to know the truth. A year later, Peg Mullen was under FBI surveillance. In a riveting narrative that moves from the American heartland to the jungles of Vietnam to the Vietnam Veterans Against the War march in Washington, DC, to an interview with Mullen’s battalion commander, Lt. Col. H. Norman Schwarzkopf, author C. D. B. Bryan brings to life with brilliant clarity a military mission gone horrifically wrong, a patriotic family’s explosive confrontation with their government, and the tragedy of a nation at war with itself. Originally intended to be an interview for the New Yorker, the story Bryan uncovered proved to be bigger than he expected, and it was serialized in three consecutive issues during February and March 1976, and was eventually published as a book that May. In 1979, Friendly Fire was made into an Emmy Award–winning TV movie, starring Carol Burnett, Ned Beatty, and Sam Waterston. This ebook features an illustrated biography of C. D. B. Bryan, including rare images from the author’s estate.
Released on 2016-06-17Categories History

Looking Back on the Vietnam War

Looking Back on the Vietnam War

Author: Brenda M. Boyle

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813579962

Category: History

Page: 223

View: 367

More than forty years have passed since the official end of the Vietnam War, yet the war’s legacies endure. Its history and iconography still provide fodder for film and fiction, communities of war refugees have spawned a wide Vietnamese diaspora, and the United States military remains embroiled in unwinnable wars with eerie echoes of Vietnam. Looking Back on the Vietnam War brings together scholars from a broad variety of disciplines, who offer fresh insights on the war’s psychological, economic, artistic, political, and environmental impacts. Each essay examines a different facet of the war, from its representation in Marvel comic books to the experiences of Vietnamese soldiers exposed to Agent Orange. By putting these pieces together, the contributors assemble an expansive yet nuanced composite portrait of the war and its global legacies. Though they come from diverse scholarly backgrounds, ranging from anthropology to film studies, the contributors are united in their commitment to original research. Whether exploring rare archives or engaging in extensive interviews, they voice perspectives that have been excluded from standard historical accounts. Looking Back on the Vietnam War thus embarks on an interdisciplinary and international investigation to discover what we remember about the war, how we remember it, and why.
Released on 2021-09-06Categories Language Arts & Disciplines

"There It Is": Narratives of the Vietnam War

Author: Tom Burns

Publisher: BoD – Books on Demand

ISBN: 9783838215617

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 688

View: 807

This book provides a critical survey of the literature on the Vietnam War and is intended both for academic and general readers. Earlier works of this kind constantly recycled criticism of a half-dozen of the same works. In this study, the aim was to discuss a much greater number of works, including a few that have never been discussed. To appeal to non-academic readers, Lit-Crit jargon was kept to a minimum, and parallels with earlier works of war literature, especially those of the two world wars, were established.
Released on 2014-12-18Categories Literary Criticism

The Vietnam War

The Vietnam War

Author: Brenda M. Boyle

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781472510174

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

View: 836

Reverberations of the Vietnam War can still be felt in American culture. The post-9/11 United States forays into the Middle East, the invasion and occupation of Iraq especially, have evoked comparisons to the nearly two decades of American presence in Viet Nam (1954-1973). That evocation has renewed interest in the Vietnam War, resulting in the re-printing of older War narratives and the publication of new ones. This volume tracks those echoes as they appear in American, Vietnamese American, and Vietnamese war literature, much of which has joined the American literary canon. Using a wide range of theoretical approaches, these essays analyze works by Michael Herr, Bao Ninh, Duong Thu Huong, Bobbie Ann Mason, le thi diem thuy, Tim O'Brien, Larry Heinemann, and newcomers Denis Johnson, Karl Marlantes, and Tatjana Solis. Including an historical timeline of the conflict and annotated guides to further reading, this is an essential guide for students and readers of contemporary American fiction
Released on 2020-03-23Categories Literary Criticism

Victimhood in American Narratives of the War in Vietnam

Victimhood in American Narratives of the War in Vietnam

Author: Aleksandra Musiał

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000054286

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

View: 659

This book revisits the American canon of novels, memoirs, and films about the war in Vietnam, in order to reassess critically the centrality of the discourse of American victimization in the country’s imagination of the conflict, and to trace the strategies of representation that establish American soldiers and veterans as the most significant victims of the war. By investigating in detail the imagery of the Vietnamese landscape recreated by American authors and directors, the volume explores the proposition that Vietnam has been turned into an American myth, demonstrating that the process resulted in a dehistoricization and mystification of the conflict that obscured its historical and political realities. Against this background, representations of the war’s victims—Vietnamese civilians and American soldiers—are then considered in light of their ideological meanings and uses. Ultimately, the book seeks to demonstrate how, in a relation of power, the question of victimhood can become ideologized, transforming into both a discourse and a strategy of representation—and in doing so, to demythologize something of the "Vietnam" of American cultural narrative.
Released on 2021-05-25Categories History

How White Men Won the Culture Wars

How White Men Won the Culture Wars

Author: Joseph Darda

Publisher: University of California Press

ISBN: 9780520381445

Category: History

Page: 277

View: 840

Reuniting white America after Vietnam. “If war among the whites brought peace and liberty to the blacks,” Frederick Douglass asked in 1875, peering into the nation’s future, “what will peace among the whites bring?” The answer then and now, after civil war and civil rights: a white reunion disguised as a veterans’ reunion. How White Men Won the Culture Wars shows how a broad contingent of white men––conservative and liberal, hawk and dove, vet and nonvet––transformed the Vietnam War into a staging ground for a post–civil rights white racial reconciliation. Conservatives could celebrate white vets as deracinated embodiments of the nation. Liberals could treat them as minoritized heroes whose voices must be heard. Erasing Americans of color, Southeast Asians, and women from the war, white men could agree, after civil rights and feminism, that they had suffered and deserved more. From the POW/MIA and veterans’ mental health movements to Rambo and “Born in the U.S.A.,” they remade their racial identities for an age of color blindness and multiculturalism in the image of the Vietnam vet. No one wins in a culture war—except, Joseph Darda argues, white men dressed in army green.