Released on 2016-07-29Categories Science

Heredity Explored

Heredity Explored

Author: Staffan Muller-Wille

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9780262332286

Category: Science

Page: 480

View: 616

Investigations of how the understanding of heredity developed in scientific, medical, agro-industrial, and political contexts of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. This book examines the wide range of scientific and social arenas in which the concept of inheritance gained relevance in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Although genetics emerged as a scientific discipline during this period, the idea of inheritance also played a role in a variety of medical, agricultural, industrial, and political contexts. The book, which follows an earlier collection, Heredity Produced (covering the period 1500 to 1870), addresses heredity in national debates over identity, kinship, and reproduction; biopolitical conceptions of heredity, degeneration, and gender; agro-industrial contexts for newly emerging genetic rationality; heredity and medical research; and the genealogical constructs and experimental systems of genetics that turned heredity into a representable and manipulable object. Taken together, the essays in Heredity Explored show that a history of heredity includes much more than the history of genetics, and that knowledge of heredity was always more than the knowledge formulated as Mendelism. It was the broader public discourse of heredity in all its contexts that made modern genetics possible. Contributors Caroline Arni, Christophe Bonneuil, Christina Brandt, Luis Campos, Jean-Paul Gaudillière, Bernd Gausemeier, Jean Gayon, Veronika Lipphardt, Ilana Löwy, J. Andrew Mendelsohn, Staffan Müller-Wille, Diane B. Paul, Theodore M. Porter, Alain Pottage, Hans-Jörg Rheinberger, Marsha L. Richmond, Helga Satzinger, Judy Johns Schloegel, Alexander von Schwerin, Hamish G. Spencer, Ulrike Vedder
Released on 2012-08-15Categories Juvenile Nonfiction

Exploring Heredity

Exploring Heredity

Author: Ella Hawley

Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group, Inc

ISBN: 9781448865185

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 24

View: 173

Children are often familiar with the idea of heredity from the first time a friend or relative points out they look like a sibling or parent. This book will help kids understand why animals’ offspring look like their parents, as well as why they may share traits with their parents and other family members. The science behind heredity is explained in simple, age-appropriate text, while graphic organizers help to show how genes and heredity work.
Released on 2015-10-06Categories Medical

Human Heredity in the Twentieth Century

Human Heredity in the Twentieth Century

Author: Bernd Gausemeier

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317319214

Category: Medical

Page: 336

View: 419

The essays in this collection examine how human heredity was understood between the end of the First World War and the early 1970s. The contributors explore the interaction of science, medicine and society in determining how heredity was viewed across the world during the politically turbulent years of the twentieth century.
Released on 1998-01-01Categories Medical

The Politics of Heredity

The Politics of Heredity

Author: Diane B. Paul

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 079143821X

Category: Medical

Page: 238

View: 295

Explores the political forces underlying shifts in thinking about the respective influence of heredity and environment in shaping human behavior, and the feasibility and morality of eugenics.
Released on 2015-01-01Categories Science

Human Heredity: Principles and Issues

Human Heredity: Principles and Issues

Author: Michael Cummings

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 9781305480674

Category: Science

Page: 496

View: 662

HUMAN HEREDITY presents the concepts of human genetics in clear, concise language and provides relevant examples that you can apply to yourself, your family, and your work environment. Author Michael Cummings explains the origin, nature, and amount of genetic diversity present in the human population and how that diversity has been shaped by natural selection. The artwork and accompanying media visually support the material by teaching rather than merely illustrating the ideas under discussion. Examining the social, cultural, and ethical implications associated with the use of genetic technology, Cummings prepares you to become a well-informed consumer of genetic-based health care services or provider of health care services. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
Released on 2018-06-19Categories Medical

The Oxford Handbook of Disability History

The Oxford Handbook of Disability History

Author: Michael Rembis

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190234966

Category: Medical

Page: 640

View: 252

Disability history exists outside of the institutions, healers, and treatments it often brings to mind. It is a history where disabled people live not just as patients or cure-seekers, but rather as people living differently in the world--and it is also a history that helps define the fundamental concepts of identity, community, citizenship, and normality. The Oxford Handbook of Disability History is the first volume of its kind to represent this history and its global scale, from ancient Greece to British West Africa. The twenty-seven articles, written by thirty experts from across the field, capture the diversity and liveliness of this emerging scholarship. Whether discussing disability in modern Chinese cinema or on the American antebellum stage, this collection provides new and valuable insights into the rich and varied lives of disabled people across time and place.
Released on 2020-04-14Categories Science

Extended Heredity

Extended Heredity

Author: Russell Bonduriansky

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691204147

Category: Science

Page: 304

View: 534

Bonduriansky and Day challenge the premise that genes alone mediate the transmission of biological information across generations and provide the raw material for natural selection. They explore the latest research showing that what happens during our lifetimes—and even our parents’ and grandparents’ lifetimes—can influence the features of our descendants. Based on this evidence, Bonduriansky and Day develop an extended concept of heredity that upends ideas about how traits can and cannot be transmitted across generations, opening the door to a new understanding of inheritance, evolution, and even human health. --Adapted from publisher description.
Released on 2012-08-30Categories Psychology

Child, Adolescent and Family Development

Child, Adolescent and Family Development

Author: Phillip T. Slee

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107402164

Category: Psychology

Page: 645

View: 599

A comprehensive study of human development from conception to adulthood, this book explores the foundations of modern developmental thought, incorporating international research set within a cultural and historical context.
Released on 2014-10-30Categories Literary Criticism

Romanticism, Origins, and the History of Heredity

Romanticism, Origins, and the History of Heredity

Author: Christine Lehleiter

Publisher: Bucknell University Press

ISBN: 9781611485660

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 338

View: 643

Examining novels, studies on plant hybridization, treatises on animal breeding, and collections of anatomical monstrosities, Origins Matter delineates how romantic authors imagined the ramifications of emerging notions of heredity for the conceptualization of selfhood.
Released on 2021-04-02Categories Science

Scientific History

Scientific History

Author: Elena Aronova

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226761411

Category: Science

Page: 256

View: 255

Increasingly, scholars in the humanities are calling for a reengagement with the natural sciences. Taking their cues from recent breakthroughs in genetics and the neurosciences, advocates of “big history” are reassessing long-held assumptions about the very definition of history, its methods, and its evidentiary base. In Scientific History, Elena Aronova maps out historians’ continuous engagement with the methods, tools, values, and scale of the natural sciences by examining several waves of their experimentation that surged highest at perceived times of trouble, from the crisis-ridden decades of the early twentieth century to the ruptures of the Cold War. The book explores the intertwined trajectories of six intellectuals and the larger programs they set in motion: Henri Berr (1863–1954), Nikolai Bukharin (1888–1938), Lucien Febvre (1878–1956), Nikolai Vavilov (1887–1943), Julian Huxley (1887–1975), and John Desmond Bernal (1901–1971). Though they held different political views, spoke different languages, and pursued different goals, these thinkers are representative of a larger motley crew who joined the techniques, approaches, and values of science with the writing of history, and who created powerful institutions and networks to support their projects. In tracing these submerged stories, Aronova reveals encounters that profoundly shaped our knowledge of the past, reminding us that it is often the forgotten parts of history that are the most revealing.
Released on 2020-01-21Categories Transportation

Bridging the Seas

Bridging the Seas

Author: Larrie D. Ferreiro

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9780262538077

Category: Transportation

Page: 409

View: 674

How the introduction of steam, iron, and steel required new rules and new ways of thinking for the design and building of ships. In the 1800s, shipbuilding moved from sail and wood to steam, iron, and steel. The competitive pressure to achieve more predictable ocean transportation drove the industrialization of shipbuilding, as shipowners demanded ships that enabled tighter scheduling, improved performance, and safe delivery of cargoes. In Bridging the Seas, naval historian Larrie Ferreiro describes this transformation of shipbuilding, portraying the rise of a professionalized naval architecture as an integral part of the Industrial Age. Picking up where his earlier book, Ships and Science, left off, Ferreiro explains that the introduction of steam, iron, and steel required new rules and new ways of thinking for designing and building ships. The characteristics of performance had to be first measured, then theorized. Ship theory led to the development of quantifiable standards that would ensure the safety and quality required by industry and governments, and this in turn led to the professionalization of naval architecture as an engineering discipline. Ferreiro describes, among other things, the technologies that allowed greater predictability in ship performance; theoretical developments in naval architecture regarding motion, speed and power, propellers, maneuvering, and structural design; the integration of theory into ship design and construction; and the emergence of a laboratory infrastructure for research.