Released on 2012-06-20Categories History

Canadians and the Natural Environment to the Twenty-First Century

Canadians and the Natural Environment to the Twenty-First Century

Author: Neil S Forkey

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 9781442662261

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 386

Canadians and the Natural Environment to the Twenty-First Century provides an ideal foundation for undergraduates and general readers on the history of Canada's complex environmental issues. Through clear, easy-to-understand case studies, Neil Forkey integrates the ongoing interplay of humans and the natural world into national, continental, and global contexts. Forkey's engaging survey addresses significant episodes from across the country over the past four hundred years: the classification of Canada's environments by its earliest inhabitants, the relationship between science and sentiment in the Victorian era, the shift towards conservation and preservation of resources in the early twentieth century, and the rise of environmentalism and issues involving First Nations at the end of the century. Canadians and the Natural Environment to the Twenty-First Century provides an accessible synthesis of the most important recent work in the field, making it a truly state-of-the-art contribution to Canadian environmental history.
Released on 2016-04-15Categories Science

Geographies of the Book

Geographies of the Book

Author: Charles W.J. Withers

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317128984

Category: Science

Page: 316

View: 606

The geography of the book is as old as the history of the book, though far less thoroughly explored. Yet research has increasingly pointed to the spatial dimensions of book history, to the transformation of texts as they are made and moved from place to place, from authors to readers and within different communities and cultures of reception. Widespread recognition of the significance of place, of the effects of movement over space and of the importance of location to the making and reception of print culture has been a feature of recent book history work, and draws in many instances upon studies within the history of science as well as geography. 'Geographies of the Book' explores the complex relationships between the making of books in certain geographical contexts, the movement of books (epistemologically as well as geographically) and the ways in which they are received.
Released on 2020-02-11Categories Architecture

Across This Land

Across This Land

Author: John C. Hudson

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9781421437590

Category: Architecture

Page: 520

View: 249

Incorporating the latest available population and economic data, this thoroughly updated edition includes; reflections on new developments, such as resource schemes, Native governments in Atlantic Canada, and the role of climate change in the Arctic; a new section focused on the US Pacific insular territories west of Hawaii; evolving views of oil and gas production resulting from the introduction of hydraulic fracturing; revised text and maps involving agricultural production based on the 2017 Census of Agriculture; current place names; more than 130 photographsThe most extensive regional geography of the North American continent on the market, Hudson's Across This Land will continue as the standard text in geography courses dealing with Canada and the United States, as well as a popular reference work for scholars, students, and lay readers.
Released on 2015-11-19Categories Architecture

A History of Architecture and Urbanism in the Americas

A History of Architecture and Urbanism in the Americas

Author: Clare Cardinal-Pett

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317431244

Category: Architecture

Page: 526

View: 428

A History of Architecture and Urbanism in the Americas is the first comprehensive survey to narrate the urbanization of the Western Hemisphere, from the Arctic Circle to Antarctica, making it a vital resource to help you understand the built environment in this part of the world. The book combines the latest scholarship about the indigenous past with an environmental history approach covering issues of climate, geology, and biology, so that you'll see the relationship between urban and rural in a new, more inclusive way. Author Clare Cardinal-Pett tells the story chronologically, from the earliest-known human migrations into the Americas to the 1930s to reveal information and insights that weave across time and place so that you can develop a complex and nuanced understanding of human-made landscape forms, patterns of urbanization, and associated building typologies. Each chapter addresses developments throughout the hemisphere and includes information from various disciplines, original artwork, and historical photographs of everyday life, which - along with numerous maps, diagrams, and traditional building photographs - will train your eye to see the built environment as you read about it.
Released on 2006Categories Aids to navigation

Setting Course

Setting Course

Author: Sharon Anne Babaian

Publisher:

ISBN: UIUC:30112080018044

Category: Aids to navigation

Page: 162

View: 832

"[A historical study that] breaks down the history of marine navigation in Canada into three broad categories of technology: shipboard navigation, charting, and shore-based navigational aids"--Page v.
Released on 2013-03-14Categories Science

Geography: Discipline, Profession and Subject since 1870

Geography: Discipline, Profession and Subject since 1870

Author: Gary S. Dunbar

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789401716833

Category: Science

Page: 336

View: 312

This book is a comprehensive treatment of the professionalization and institutionalization of the academic discipline of geography in Europe and North America, with emphasis on the 20th century and the last quarter of the 19th. No other book has ever attempted coverage of this sort. It is relevant to geographers, practitioners of the social and earth sciences, and historians of science and education.
Released on 1998-12-10Categories Social Science

With Scarcely a Ripple

With Scarcely a Ripple

Author: Randy William Widdis

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 9780773567238

Category: Social Science

Page: 441

View: 544

Using a prosopographical approach that combines descriptive exposition, quantitative tabulation, and structural analysis, Randy Widdis determines the geographical and social origins of migrants, the distance and direction of migration corridors, and geographical destinations in both the United States and Canada. The study provides a new view of the invisible Anglo-Canadian, one of the largest and least understood immigrant groups in the United States. Widdis's results show that there were many differences between Anglo-Canadians, and that their experience in the United States was much more complex than is usually assumed. With Scarcely a Ripple not only contributes to our understanding of the dynamics of intra-regional, inter-regional, and return Anglo-Canadian migration but also interprets this movement in terms of the paradox of an emerging Canadian identity and a developing integration with the United States. It offers a historical geographical perspective on a subject that, in this era of free trade and globalization, is more relevant than ever.
Released on 2009-01-01Categories History

The Reluctant Land

The Reluctant Land

Author: Cole Harris

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN: 9780774858380

Category: History

Page: 524

View: 773

Winner, 2008 K.D. Srivastava Prize for Excellence in Scholarly Publishing, UBC Press The Reluctant Land describes the evolving pattern of settlement and the changing relationships of people and land in Canada from the end of the fifteenth century to the Confederation years of the late 1860s and early 1870s. It shows how a deeply indigenous land was reconstituted in European terms, and, at the same time, how European ways were recalibrated in this non-European space. It also shows how an archipelago of scattered settlement emerged out of an encounter with a parsimonious territory, and suggests how deeply this encounter differed from an American relationship with abundance. The book begins with a description of land and life in northern North America in 1500, and ends by considering the relationship between the pattern of early Canada and the country as we know it today. Intended to illuminate the background of modern Canada, The Reluctant Land is an intelligent discussion of people and place that will be welcomed by scholars and lay readers alike.
Released on 2018-07-24Categories History

A Land of Dreams

A Land of Dreams

Author: Patrick Mannion

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 9780773554061

Category: History

Page: 332

View: 721

Wherever they settled, immigrants from Ireland and their descendants shaped and reshaped their understanding of being Irish in response to circumstances in both the old and new worlds. In A Land of Dreams, Patrick Mannion analyzes and compares the evolution of Irish identity in three communities on the prow of northeastern North America: St John’s, Newfoundland, Halifax, Nova Scotia, and Portland, Maine, in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. These three port cities, home to diverse Irish populations in different stages of development and in different national contexts, provide a fascinating setting for a study of intergenerational ethnicity. Mannion traces how Irishness could, at certain points, form the basis of a strong, cohesive identity among Catholics of Irish descent, while at other times it faded into the background. Although there was a consistent, often romantic gaze across the Atlantic to the old land, many of the organizations that helped mediate large-scale public engagement with the affairs of Ireland – especially Irish nationalist associations – spread from further west on the North American mainland. Irish ethnicity did not, therefore, develop in isolation, but rather as a result of a complex interplay of local, regional, national, and transnational networks. This volume shows that despite a growing generational distance, Ireland remained “a land of dreams” for many immigrants and their descendants. They were connected to a transnational Irish diaspora well into the twentieth century.
Released on 2012-07-31Categories History

An Environmental History of Canada

An Environmental History of Canada

Author: Laurel Sefton MacDowell

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN: 9780774821032

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 867

Throughout history most people have associated northern North America with wilderness – with abundant fish and game, snow-capped mountains, and endless forest and prairie. Canada’s contemporary picture gallery, however, contains more disturbing images – deforested mountains, empty fisheries, and melting ice caps. Adopting both a chronological and thematic approach, Laurel MacDowell examines human interactions with the land, and the origins of our current environmental crisis, from first peoples to the Kyoto Protocol. This richly illustrated exploration of the past from an environmental perspective will change the way Canadians and others around the world think about – and look at – Canada.