Released on 2012Categories Medical

Influenza

Influenza

Author: George Dehner

Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Pre

ISBN: 9780822977858

Category: Medical

Page: 298

View: 990

Dehner examines the wide disparity in national and international responses to influenza pandemics, from the Russian flu of 1889 to the swine flu outbreak in 2009. He chronicles the technological and institutional progress made along the way and shows how these developments can shape an effective future policy.
Released on 2019-10-01Categories Social Science

Influenza

Influenza

Author: Jeremy Brown

Publisher: Atria Books

ISBN: 9781501181252

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 705

“Highlights that influenza is still a real and present threat and demonstrates the power and limitations of modern medicine.” —The Wall Street Journal “A surprisingly compelling and accessible story of one of the world’s most deadly diseases. It is timely and interesting, engaging and sobering.” —David Gregort, CNN political analyst and former moderator for NBC’s Meet the Press A veteran ER doctor explores the troubling, terrifying, and complex history and present-day research of the flu virus, from the origins of the Great Flu that killed millions, to vexing questions such as: are we prepared for the next epidemic, should you get a flu shot, and how close are we to finding a cure? While influenza is now often thought of as a common but mild disease, it still kills more than thirty thousand people in the United States each year. Dr. Jeremy Brown, a veteran ER doctor and director of the Office of Emergency Care Research at the National Institutes of Health, talks with leading epidemiologists, policy makers, and the researcher who first sequenced the genetic building blocks of the original 1918 virus to offer both a comprehensive history and a road map to protect us from the next outbreak. Dr. Brown explores the terrifying and complex history of the flu virus and looks at the controversy over vaccinations and the federal government’s role in preparing for pandemic outbreaks. Though a hundred years of advancement in medical research and technology have passed since the 1918 disaster, Dr. Brown warns that many of the most vital questions about the flu virus continue to confound even the leading experts.
Released on 2008Categories History

Bioterror

Bioterror

Author: R. William Johnstone

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780275993269

Category: History

Page: 219

View: 491

Bioterror threats are as significant to America's security as those wrought by bombs; this book examines the nature of the threats and U.S. preparedness.
Released on 2011-04-01Categories Social Science

Flu

Flu

Author: Gina Kolata

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 9781429979351

Category: Social Science

Page: 330

View: 416

The fascinating, true story of the world's deadliest disease. In 1918, the Great Flu Epidemic felled the young and healthy virtually overnight. An estimated forty million people died as the epidemic raged. Children were left orphaned and families were devastated. As many American soldiers were killed by the 1918 flu as were killed in battle during World War I. And no area of the globe was safe. Eskimos living in remote outposts in the frozen tundra were sickened and killed by the flu in such numbers that entire villages were wiped out. Scientists have recently rediscovered shards of the flu virus frozen in Alaska and preserved in scraps of tissue in a government warehouse. Gina Kolata, an acclaimed reporter for The New York Times, unravels the mystery of this lethal virus with the high drama of a great adventure story. Delving into the history of the flu and previous epidemics, detailing the science and the latest understanding of this mortal disease, Kolata addresses the prospects for a great epidemic recurring, and, most important, what can be done to prevent it.
Released on 2014-01-06Categories Medical

Textbook of Influenza

Textbook of Influenza

Author: Robert G. Webster

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118636831

Category: Medical

Page: 520

View: 725

The Textbook of Influenza is a comprehensive resourcecovering all aspects of influenza, from the genetic and molecularbiology of the virus through to clinical aspects of the disease andthe latest drug developments and treatments. This new edition hasbeen completely revised and reflects the integration of disciplinesconcerning the emergence, evolution, pathogenesis and control ofinfluenza viruses in the field of human and veterinary publichealth. Textbook of Influenza examines the lessons learnt fromthe latest pandemic and provides the current state of knowledge formany yet unresolved issues related to virus origin, spread,pathogenesis and disease severity to better prepare for futurepandemics. It covers the background to recent advances in influenzagenomics and reverse genetics which have allowed the identificationof virus virulence factors and the analysis and reconstruction ofinfluenza viruses such as the 1918 Spanish flu strain. This new edition is divided into eight key sections, containingchapters co-written by international experts from both the clinicaland scientific communities, covering: • Influenza Perspectives • Structure and Replication • Evolution and Ecology • Epidemiology and Surveillance • Immunology • Vaccines and Vaccine Development • Clinical Aspects and Antivirals • Public Health Textbook of Influenza is for all those working in thearea of influenza including clinical and basic scientists,immunologists, molecular and structural virologists, public healthofficials and global pandemic control planners.
Released on 2010-03-09Categories Medical

Public Health and Infectious Diseases

Public Health and Infectious Diseases

Author: Jeffrey Griffiths

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN: 9780123815071

Category: Medical

Page: 512

View: 309

Emerging infectious diseases may be defined as diseases being caused by pathogens only recently recognized to exist. This group of diseases is important globally, and the experience of the last 30 years suggests that new emerging diseases are likely to bedevil us. As the global climate changes, so changes the environment, which can support not only the pathogens, but also their vectors of transmission. This expands the exposure and effects of infectious disease and, therefore, the importance of widespread understanding of the relationship between public health and infectious disease. This work brings together chapters that explain reasons for the emergence of these infectious diseases. These include the ecological context of human interactions with other humans, with animals that may host human pathogens, and with a changing agricultural and industrial environment, increasing resistance to antimicrobials, the ubiquity of global travel, and international commerce. * Features the latest discoveries related to influenza with a newly published article by Davidson Hamer and Jean van Seventer * Provides a listing of rare diseases that have become resurgent or spread their geographic distribution and are re-emergent * Highlights dengue and malaria, as well as agents such as West Nile and other arboviruses that have spread to new continents causing widespread concerns * Includes discussions of climate influencing the spread of infectious disease and political and societal aspects
Released on 2010Categories Law

Influenza and Public Health

Influenza and Public Health

Author: Jennifer Lee Gunn

Publisher: Earthscan

ISBN: 9781849776448

Category: Law

Page: 293

View: 358

Major influenza pandemics pose a constant threat. As evidenced by recent H5N1 avian flu and novel H1N1, influenza outbreaks can come in close succession, yet differ in their transmission and impact. With accelerated levels of commercial and population mobility, new forms of flu virus can also spread across the globe with unprecedented speed. Responding quickly and adequately to each outbreak becomes imperative on the part of governments and global public health organizations, but the difficulties of doing so are legion. One tool for pandemic planning is analysis of responses to past pandemics that provide insight into productive ways forward.This book investigates past influenza pandemics in light of today's, so as to afford critical insights into possible transmission patterns, experiences, mistakes, and interventions. It explores several pandemics over the past century, from the infamous 1918 Spanish Influenza, the avian flu epidemic of 2003, and the novel H1N1 pandemic of 2009, to lesser-known outbreaks such as the 1889-90 influenza pandemic and the Hong Kong Flu of 1968. Contributors to the volume examine cases from a wide range of disciplines, including history, sociology, epidemiology, virology, geography, and public health, identifying patterns that cut across pandemics in order to guide contemporary responses to infectious outbreaks.
Released on 2013-01-01Categories History

The Last Plague

The Last Plague

Author: Mark Osborne Humphries

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 9781442610446

Category: History

Page: 349

View: 899

The 'Spanish' influenza of 1918 was the deadliest pandemic in history, killing as many as 50 million people worldwide. Canadian federal public health officials tried to prevent the disease from entering the country by implementing a maritime quarantine, as had been their standard practice since the cholera epidemics of 1832. But the 1918 flu was a different type of disease. In spite of the best efforts of both federal and local officials, up to fifty thousand Canadians died. In The Last Plague, Mark Osborne Humphries examines how federal epidemic disease management strategies developed before the First World War, arguing that the deadliest epidemic in Canadian history ultimately challenged traditional ideas about disease and public health governance. Using federal, provincial, and municipal archival sources, newspapers, and newly discovered military records – as well as original epidemiological studies – Humphries' sweeping national study situates the flu within a larger social, political, and military context for the first time. His provocative conclusion is that the 1918 flu crisis had important long-term consequences at the national level, ushering in the 'modern' era of public health in Canada.
Released on 2014Categories Medical

The Spanish Influenza Pandemic of 1918-1919

The Spanish Influenza Pandemic of 1918-1919

Author: María Isabel Porras Gallo

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer

ISBN: 9781580464963

Category: Medical

Page: 292

View: 431

Sheds new light on what the WHO described as "the single most devastating infectious disease outbreak ever recorded," focusing on social control, gender, class, religion, national identity, and military medicine's reactions to the pandemic.
Released on 2007-06-07Categories Medical

Mass Mediated Disease

Mass Mediated Disease

Author: Debra E. Blakely

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 0739113887

Category: Medical

Page: 202

View: 136

Influenza is a continuing news story with three clearly defined pandemics. Spanning a history of over fifty years, Mass Mediated Disease focuses on the Spanish influenza pandemic of 1918, the Asian influenza pandemic of 1957, and the Hong Kong influenza pandemic of 1968, by discussing news stories reported by the New York Times, London Times, and other popular magazines. This groundbreaking work demonstrates that the social construction of influenza changed over time, which was reflected by the mass media, and ultimately resulted in public policies that clearly illustrate the link between media and policy formation in the United States. This comprehensive history serves as an example for future incidents involving mass casualties or mass contamination from infectious agents_especially on what to expect, what to do, and what not to do regarding the crisis response, reportage, and resulting policies.