Released on 2002-11-23Categories History

Ireland and the Great War

Ireland and the Great War

Author: Adrian Gregory

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 0719059259

Category: History

Page: 242

View: 929

This volume brings together new research whilst re-evaluating older assumptions about the immediate and continuing impact of World War I on Ireland. It explores some lesser-known aspects of Ireland’s war years as well as including studies of more traditional areas. Individual articles cover military, social, cultural, political, and economic aspects of the Great War, as well as reflecting on continuity and change within Irish historiography. In doing so, they analyze how the experience and memory of the War have contributed to identity formation and the legitimization of political violence.
Released on 2008Categories History

Our War

Our War

Author: John Horne

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105132204707

Category: History

Page: 358

View: 207

"This book, written by some of our leading historians, tells the story of the Great War in Irish history which saw over 200,000 Irish soldiers fighting. It relays the experience of ordinary Irish people during the war and chronicles the effect this war had, and still has, on Irish society. Soldiers in the trenches, volunteer nurses, politicians, women and the workforce are all examined. Archival letters, diaries, wills and illustrations are reproduced which document the pride, fear, anxiety and sorrow felt by soldiers, nurses, sweethearts, families and friends."--BOOK JACKET.
Released on 2003Categories Literary Criticism

The Great War in Irish Poetry

The Great War in Irish Poetry

Author: Fran Brearton

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0199261385

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 332

View: 667

The Great War in Irish Poetry explores the impact of the First World War on the work of W. B. Yeats, Robert Graves, and Louis MacNeice in the period 1914-45, and on three contemporary Northern Irish poets, Derek Mahon, Seamus Heaney, and Michael Longley. Its concern is to place their work, and memory of the Great War, in the context of Irish culture and politics in the twentieth century. The historical background to Irish involvement in the Great War is explained, as are the ways in which some of the events of 1912-1920--the Home Rule crisis, the loss of the Titanic, the Battle of the Somme, the Easter Rising--still reverberate in the politics of remembrance in Northern Ireland. While the Great War is perceived as central to English culture, and its literature holds a privileged position in the English literary canon, the centrality of the Great War to Irish writing has seldom been acknowledged. This book is concerned with the extent to which recognition of the importance of the Great War in Irish writing has become a casualty of competing versions of the literary canon. It shows that, despite complications in Irish domestic politics which led to the repression of "official memory" of the Great War in Ireland, Irish poets, particularly those writing in the "troubled" Northern Ireland of the last thirty years, have been drawn throughout the century to the events and images of 1914-18.
Released on 2019-11-28Categories History

Ireland and the Great War

Ireland and the Great War

Author: Niamh Gallagher

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781786726148

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 451

On 4 August 1914 following the outbreak of European hostilities, large sections of Irish Protestants and Catholics rallied to support the British and Allied war efforts. Yet less than two years later, the Easter Rising of 1916 allegedly put a stop to the Catholic commitment in exchange for a re-emphasis on the national question. In Ireland and the Great War Niamh Gallagher draws upon a formidable array of original research to offer a radical new reading of Irish involvement in the world's first total war. Exploring the 'home front' and Irish diasporic communities in Canada, Australia, and Britain, Gallagher reveals that substantial support for the Allied war effort continued largely unabated not only until November 1918, but afterwards as well. Rich in social texture and with fascinating new case studies of Irish participation in the conflict, this book has the makings of a major rethinking of Ireland's twentieth century.
Released on 2014-10-01Categories World War, 1914-1918

Ireland's Great War

Ireland's Great War

Author: Kevin Myers

Publisher:

ISBN: 1843516357

Category: World War, 1914-1918

Page: 248

View: 618

Kevin Myers pioneered the study of the Irish in the Great War. His first article on the subject appeared in November 1979, based on the only major interview with the Irish Victoria Cross winner, Sergeant Jack Moyney VC. His many subsequent articles and talks on the subject over subsequent decades have covered the entire historical and military spectrum, from the first Irish deaths in a naval engagement in the North Sea on 6 August 1914, with the sinking of HMS Amphion, to the very last shots, shortly before 11 am, at the Second Battle of Mons, on 11 November 1918, which fatally wounded an Irish cavalryman. This is a selection of his works, drawn from newspaper articles and talks, many of them never published before. It contains new and startling insights into the bravery, stoicism and unbearable tragedy of the Irish in the Great War.
Released on 2003-05-29Categories History

Ireland, the Great War and the Geography of Remembrance

Ireland, the Great War and the Geography of Remembrance

Author: Nuala C. Johnson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139436953

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 391

Nuala C. Johnson explores the complex relationship between social memory and space in the representation of war in Ireland. The Irish experience of the Great War, and its commemoration, is the location of Dr Johnson's sustained and pioneering examination of the development of memorial landscapes, and her study represents a major contribution both to cultural geography and to the historiography of remembrance. Attractively illustrated, this book combines theoretical perspectives with original primary research showing how memory literally took place in post-1918 Ireland, and the various conflicts and struggles that were both a cause and effect of this process. Of interest to scholars in a number of disciplines, Ireland, The Great War and The Geography of Remembrance shows powerfully how Irish efforts to collectively remember the Great War were constantly in dialogue with issues surrounding the national question, and the memorials themselves bore witness to these tensions and ambiguities.
Released on 2014-07-07Categories History

Irish Voices from the Great War

Irish Voices from the Great War

Author: Myles Dungan

Publisher: Merrion Press

ISBN: 9781908928832

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 733

This pioneering study, first published in 1995, retains its rank as one of the most powerful histories ever written about Irish involvement in World War 1. This year, the centenary of the war, sees its timely re-publication as the Irishmen who fought in that war re-enter the national memory after decades of indifference and hostility. The gradual softening of attitudes over the last twenty years amid great historic change on the island of Ireland, is due in no small part to the efforts of historians, such as Myles Dungan, to tell thousands of forgotten stories. Drawing on the diaries, letters, literary works and oral accounts of soldiers, Myles Dungan tells some of the personal stories of what Irishmen, unionist and nationalist, went through during the Great War and how many of them drew closer together during that horror than at any time since. This volume deals with a selection of the most important battles and campaigns in which the three Irish Divisions participated.
Released on 2019-06-12Categories History

Remembrance of the Great War in the Irish Free State, 1914–1937

Remembrance of the Great War in the Irish Free State, 1914–1937

Author: Mandy Link

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783030195113

Category: History

Page: 217

View: 916

This book focuses on how Irish remembrance of the First World War impacted the emerging Irish identity in the postcolonial Irish Free State. While all combatants of the “war to end all wars” commemorated the war, Irish memorial efforts were fraught with debate over Irish identity and politics that frequently resulted in violence against commemorators and World War I veterans. The book examines the Flanders poppy, the Victory and Armistice Day parades, the National War Memorial, church memorials, and private remembrances. Highlighting the links between war, memory, empire and decolonization, it ultimately argues that the Great War, its commemorations, and veterans retained political potency between 1914 and 1937 and were a powerful part of early Free State life.
Released on 2008-10-16Categories History

The Last Great War

The Last Great War

Author: Adrian Gregory

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107650862

Category: History

Page: 364

View: 171

What was it that the British people believed they were fighting for in 1914–18? This compelling history of the British home front during the First World War offers an entirely new account of how British society understood and endured the war. Drawing on official archives, memoirs, diaries and letters, Adrian Gregory sheds new light on the public reaction to the war, examining the role of propaganda and rumour in fostering patriotism and hatred of the enemy. He shows the importance of the ethic of volunteerism and the rhetoric of sacrifice in debates over where the burdens of war should fall as well as the influence of religious ideas on wartime culture. As the war drew to a climax and tensions about the distribution of sacrifices threatened to tear society apart, he shows how victory and the processes of commemoration helped create a fiction of a society united in grief.
Released on 2017-05-15Categories History

Messines to Carrick Hill:

Messines to Carrick Hill:

Author: Thomas Burke

Publisher: Mercier Press Ltd

ISBN: 9781781174852

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 929

The book is structured around a collection of letters written by a nineteen year old Irish officer in the 6th Royal Irish Regiment, 2nd Lieutenant Michael Wall from Carrick Hill, near Malahide in north Co. Dublin. Michael was educated by the Christian Brothers in Dublin and destined to study science at UCD before being seduced by the illusion of adventure through war. By contextualising and expanding the content of Wall’s letters and setting them within the entrenched battle zone of the Messines Ridge, Burke offers a unique insight into the trench life this young Irish man experienced, his disillusionment with war and his desire to get home. Burke also presents an account of the origin, preparations and successful execution of the battle to take Wijtschate on 7 June 1917 in which the 16th (Irish) and 36th (Ulster) Divisions played a pivotal role. In conclusion Burke offers an insight into the contentious subject of remembrance of the First World War in Ireland in the late 1920s