Released on 1996Categories Great Britain

An Irish Empire?

An Irish Empire?

Author: Keith Jeffery

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 0719038731

Category: Great Britain

Page: 248

View: 818

Eight essays examine the experience and role of the Irish in the British empire during the 19th and 20th centuries, based on the understanding that, Ireland being less integrated, it differed from that of the other Celtic nations submerged in the United Kingdom. They discuss film, sport, India, the Irish military tradition, Irish unionists, Empire Day in Ireland from 1896 to 1962, Northern Irish businessmen, and Ulster resistance and loyalist rebellion. Distributed in the US by St. Martin's Press. Annotation copyright by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR
Released on 2008-04-17Categories History

Spying on Ireland

Spying on Ireland

Author: Eunan O'Halpin

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199253296

Category: History

Page: 358

View: 487

Irish neutrality during the Second World War presented Britain with significant challenges to its security. Exploring how British agencies identified and addressed these problems, Eunan O'Halpin casts fresh light on the significance of both espionage and cooperation between agencies for developing wider relations between the two countries.
Released on 2022-04-14Categories History

The Irish Difference

The Irish Difference

Author: Fergal Tobin

Publisher: Atlantic Books

ISBN: 9781838952624

Category: History

Page: 311

View: 944

'The beauty of this book is in the telling: The Irish Difference lays out its themes and chronologies with impeccable clarity, and is full of fascinating detail... Exemplary.' Irish Independent For hundreds of years, the islands and their constituent tribes that make up the British Isles have lived next door to each other in a manner that, over time, suggested some movement towards political union. It was an uneven, stop-start business and it worked better in some places than in others. Still, England, Wales and Scotland have hung together through thick and thin, despite internal divisions of language, religion, law, culture and disposition that might have broken up a less resilient polity. And, for a long time, it seemed that something similar might have been said about the smaller island to the west: Ireland. Ireland was always a more awkward fit in the London-centric mini-imperium but no one imagined that it might detach itself altogether, until the moment came for rupture, quite suddenly and dramatically, in the fall-out from World War I. So, what was it - is it - about Ireland that is so different? Different enough to sever historical ties of centuries with such sudden violence and unapologetic efficiency. Wherein lies the Irish difference, a difference sufficient to have caused a rupture of that nature? In a wide-ranging and witty narrative, historian Fergal Tobin looks into Ireland's past, taking in everything from religion and politics to sports and literature, and traces the roots of her journey towards independence.
Released on 2006-09Categories History

The Anthropology of Ireland

The Anthropology of Ireland

Author: Thomas M. Wilson

Publisher: Berg

ISBN: 9781845202392

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 693

--Where and what is Ireland? --What are the identities of the people of Ireland? --How has European Union membership shaped Irish people's lives and interests? --How global is local Ireland? This book argues that such questions can be answered only by understanding everyday aspects of Irish culture and identity. Such understanding is achieved by paying close attention to what people in Ireland themselves say about the radical changes in their lives in the context of wider global transformation. As notions of sex, religion, and politics are radically reworked in an Ireland being re-imagined in ways inconceivable just a generation ago, anthropologists have been at the forefront of recording the results. The first comprehensive book-length introduction to anthropological research on the island as a whole, The Anthropology of Ireland considers the changing place in a changing Ireland of religion, sex, sport, race, dance, young people, the Travellers, St Patrick's Day and much more.
Released on 2003Categories History

In Search of Ancient Ireland

In Search of Ancient Ireland

Author: Carmel McCaffrey

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781566635257

Category: History

Page: 305

View: 304

This exciting, fascinating history of Ireland cobles together the legends and archaeological evidence to trace the festivals, historic places, major players, and key events that helped shape the Irish identity from 9000 B.C. to 1167 A.D. Reprint.
Released on 2006-03-10Categories Fiction

Legends, Charms and Superstitions of Ireland

Legends, Charms and Superstitions of Ireland

Author: Lady Wilde

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 9780486447339

Category: Fiction

Page: 370

View: 493

Features an Irish view of a spiritual and invisible world populated by fairies, elves, and evil beings as described through eerie tales and beguiling accounts of superstitions, animal legends, and ancient charms.
Released on 2009-03-01Categories Business & Economics

Making Ireland Irish

Making Ireland Irish

Author: Eric G. E. Zuelow

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 0815632258

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 388

View: 909

From the dark shadow of civil war to the pastel-painted towns of today, Making Ireland Irish provides a sweeping account of the evolution of the Irish tourist industry over the twentieth century. Drawing on an extensive array of previously untapped or underused sources, Eric G. E. Zuelow examines how a small group of tourism advocates, inspired by tourist development movements in countries such as France and Spain, worked tirelessly to convince their Irish compatriots that tourism was the secret to Ireland’s success. Over time, tourism went from being a national joke to a national interest. Men and women from across Irish society joined in, eager to help shape their country and culture for visitors’ eyes. The result was Ireland as it is depicted today, a land of blue skies, smiling faces, pastel towns, natural beauty, ancient history, and timeless traditions. With lucid prose and vivid detail, Zuelow explains how careful planning transformed Irish towns and villages from grey and unattractive to bright and inviting; sanitized Irish history to avoid offending Ireland’s largest tourist market, the English; and supplanted traditional rural fairs revolving around muddy animals and featuring sexually suggestive ceremonies with new family-friendly festivals and events filling today’s tourist calendar. By challenging existing notions that the Irish tourist product is either timeless or the consequence of colonialism, Zuelow demonstrates that the development of tourist imagery and Irish national identity was not the result of a handful of elites or a postcolonial legacy, but rather the product of an extended discussion that ultimately involved a broad cross-section of society, both inside and outside Ireland. Tourism, he argues, played a vital role in “making Ireland Irish.”
Released on 2008-01-01Categories Ireland

Ireland and Irish America

Ireland and Irish America

Author: Kerby A. Miller

Publisher: Field Day Publications

ISBN: 9780946755394

Category: Ireland

Page: 411

View: 187

Between 1600 and 1929, perhaps seven million men and women left Ireland and crossed the Atlantic. Ireland and Irish America is concerned with Catholics and Protestants, rural and urban dwellers, men and women on both sides of that vast ocean. Drawing on over thirty years of research, in sources as disparate as emigrants' letters and demographic data, it recovers the experiences and opinions of emigrants as varied as the Rev. James McGregor, who in 1718 led the first major settlement of Presbyterians from Ulster to the New World, Mary Rush, a desperate refugee from the Great Famine in County Sligo, and Tom Brick, an Irish-speaking Kerryman on the American prairie in the early 1900s. Above all, Ireland and Irish America offers a trenchant analysis of mass migration's causes, its consequences, and its popular and political interpretations. In the process, it challenges the conventional 'two traditions' (Protestant versus Catholic) paradigm of Irish and Irish diasporan history, and it illuminates the hegemonic forces and relationships that governed the Irish and Irish-American worlds created and linked by transatlantic capitalism.
Released on 2013-11-18Categories History

Ireland's Great Famine in Irish-American History

Ireland's Great Famine in Irish-American History

Author: Mary Kelly

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781442226081

Category: History

Page: 289

View: 431

Ireland’s Great Famine in Irish-American History: Enshrining a Fateful Memory offers a new, concise interpretation of the history of the Irish in America. Author and distinguished professor Mary Kelly’s book is the first synthesized volume to track Ireland’s Great Famine within America’s immigrant history, and to consider the impact of the Famine on Irish ethnic identity between the mid-1800s and the end of the twentieth century. Moving beyond traditional emphases on Irish-American cornerstones such as church, party, and education, the book maps the Famine’s legacy over a century and a half of settlement and assimilation. This is the first attempt to contextualize a painful memory that has endured fitfully, and unquestionably, throughout Irish-American historical experience.