Released on 1996Categories History

Historical Dictionary of Stuart England, 1603-1689

Historical Dictionary of Stuart England, 1603-1689

Author: Ronald H. Fritze

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313283918

Category: History

Page: 611

View: 526

A ready reference for general readers, undergraduate and graduate students, teachers, and scholars, this volume contains 320 entries by 80 experts, covering a broad range of topics, plus a lengthy chronology and extensive bibliography. The entries are based on current scholarship and are followed by pertinent references. The entries include biographical profiles of major figures; the courts, exchequer, and other institutions; major court cases and documents, such as the Great Contract and Bill of Rights; and controversial examples of the royal prerogative. The Civil Wars, Glorious Revolution, and other rebellions and the Dutch, French, and Spanish Wars are also covered as well as religious movements, political groups, social and economic topics, and cultural subjects.
Released on 2011-07-21Categories History

Godly Kingship in Restoration England

Godly Kingship in Restoration England

Author: Jacqueline Rose

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139499675

Category: History

Page:

View: 163

The position of English monarchs as supreme governors of the Church of England profoundly affected early modern politics and religion. This innovative book explores how tensions in church-state relations created by Henry VIII's Reformation continued to influence relationships between the crown, Parliament and common law during the Restoration, a distinct phase in England's 'long Reformation'. Debates about the powers of kings and parliaments, the treatment of Dissenters and emerging concepts of toleration were viewed through a Reformation prism where legitimacy depended on godly status. This book discusses how the institutional, legal and ideological framework of supremacy perpetuated the language of godly kingship after 1660 and how supremacy was complicated by the ambivalent Tudor legacy. It was manipulated by not only Anglicans, but also tolerant kings and intolerant parliaments, Catholics, Dissenters and radicals like Thomas Hobbes. Invented to uphold the religious and political establishments, supremacy paradoxically ended up subverting them.
Released on 2013-08-19Categories Literary Criticism

The Poetics and Politics of Youth in Milton's England

The Poetics and Politics of Youth in Milton's England

Author: Blaine Greteman

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107434790

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 262

View: 937

As the notion of government by consent took hold in early modern England, many authors used childhood and maturity to address contentious questions of political representation - about who has a voice and who can speak on his or her own behalf. For John Milton, Ben Jonson, William Prynne, Thomas Hobbes and others, the period between infancy and adulthood became a site of intense scrutiny, especially as they examined the role of a literary education in turning children into political actors. Drawing on new archival evidence, Blaine Greteman argues that coming of age in the seventeenth century was a uniquely political act. His study makes a compelling case for understanding childhood as a decisive factor in debates over consent, autonomy and political voice, and will offer graduate students and scholars a new perspective on the emergence of apolitical children's literature in the eighteenth century.
Released on 1999-11-19Categories History

Agnes Bowker's Cat

Agnes Bowker's Cat

Author: David Cressy

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191542947

Category: History

Page: 364

View: 474

"What a world is this? It is marvelous, it is monstrous! I hear say there is a young woman, born in the town of Harborough, one Bowker, a butcher's daughter, which of late, God wot, is bought to bed of a cat, or have delivered a cat, or, if you will, is the mother of a cat! Oh God!" William Bullein - Dialogue Against the Fever Pestilence (1578) David Cressy examines how the orderly, Protestant, and hierarchical society of post-Reformation England coped with the cultural challenges posed by beliefs and events outside the social norm. Drawing on local texts and narratives he reveals how a series of troubling and unorthodox happenings-bestiality and monstrous births, seduction and abortion, nakedness and cross-dressing, excommunication and irregular burial, iconoclasm and vandalism-disturbed the margins, cut across the grain, and set the authorities on edge.
Released on 2000Categories History

Travesties and Transgressions in Tudor and Stuart England

Travesties and Transgressions in Tudor and Stuart England

Author: David Cressy

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0198207816

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 481

In Travesties and Transgressions, David Cressy examines how the orderly, Protestant, and hierarchical society of post-Reformation England coped with the cultural challenges posed by beliefs and events outside the social norm. He uses a series of linked stories and close readings of local texts and narratives to investigate unorthodox happenings such as bestiality and monstrous births, seduction and abortion, excommunication and irregular burial, nakedness and cross-dressing. Each story, and the reaction it generated, exposes the strains and stresses of its local time and circumstances. The reigns of Elizabeth, James, and Charles I were witness to endless religious disputes, tussles for power within the aristocracy, and arguments galore about the behaviour and beliefs of common people. Questions raised by 'unnatural' episodes were debated throughout society at local and national levels, and engaged the attention of the magistrates, the bishops, the crown, and the court. The resolution of such questions was not taken lightly in a world in which God and the devil still fought for people's souls.
Released on 2022Categories History

Libel and Lampoon

Libel and Lampoon

Author: Andrew Benjamin Bricker

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192846150

Category: History

Page: 341

View: 714

Libel and Lampoon shows how English satire and the law mutually shaped each other during the long eighteenth century. Following the lapse of prepublication licensing in 1695, the authorities quickly turned to the courts and newly repurposed libel laws in an attempt to regulate the press. In response, satirists and their booksellers devised a range of evasions. Writers increasingly capitalized on forms of verbal ambiguity, including irony, allegory, circumlocution, and indirection, while shifty printers and booksellers turned to a host of publication ruses that complicated the mechanics of both detection and prosecution. In effect, the elegant insults, comical periphrases, and booksellers' tricks that came to typify eighteenth-century satire were a way of writing and publishing born of legal necessity. Early on, these emergent satiric practices stymied the authorities and the courts. But they also led to new legislation and innovative courtroom procedures that targeted satire's most routine evasions. Especially important were a series of rulings that increased the legal liabilities of printers and booksellers and that expanded and refined doctrines for the courtroom interpretation of verbal ambiguity, irony, and allegory. By the mid-eighteenth century, satirists and their booksellers faced a range of newfound legal pressures. Rather than disappearing, however, personal and political satire began to migrate to dramatic mimicry and caricature-acoustic and visual forms that relied less on verbal ambiguity and were therefore not subject to either the provisions of preperformance dramatic licensing or the courtroom interpretive procedures that had earlier enabled the prosecution of printed satire.
Released on 2017-01-01Categories Coroners

The Conquest of Death

The Conquest of Death

Author: Matthew H. Lockwood

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300217063

Category: Coroners

Page: 417

View: 605

Cover -- Half Title -- Title -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- ACKNOWLEDGMENTS -- INTRODUCTION -- ONE: Restricting Private Warfare -- TWO: Coroners and Communities -- THREE: Proving the Case -- FOUR: One Concept of Justice -- FIVE: Economic Interest and the Oversight of Violence -- SIX: The Changing Nature of Control -- SEVEN: A Crisis of Violence? -- EIGHT: Legislation, Incentivization, and a New System of Oversight -- CONCLUSION -- NOTES -- INDEX -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- Q -- R -- S -- T -- W -- Y
Released on 2018-03-09Categories Religion

Jansenism and England

Jansenism and England

Author: Thomas Palmer

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192548597

Category: Religion

Page: 328

View: 983

Jansenism and England: Moral Rigorism across the Confessions examines the impact in mid- to later-seventeenth-century England of the major contemporary religious controversy in France, which revolved around the formal condemnation of a heresy popularly called Jansenism. The associated debates involved fundamental questions about the doctrine of grace and moral theology, about the life of the Church and the conduct of individual Christians. Thomas Palmer analyses the main themes of the controversy and an account of instances of English interest, arguing that English Protestant theologians who were in the process of working out their own views on basic theological questions recognised the relevance of the continental debates. The arguments evolved by the French writers also constitute a point of comparison for the developing views of English theologians. Where the Jansenists reasserted an Augustinian emphasis on the gratuity of salvation against Catholic theologians who over-valued the powers of human nature, the English writers examined here, arguing against Protestant theologians who denied nature any moral potency, emphasised man's contribution to his own salvation. Both arguments have been seen to contain a corrosive individualism, the former through its preoccupation with the luminous experience of grace, the latter through its tendency to elide grace and moral virtue. These assessments are challenged here. Nevertheless, these theologians did encourage greater individualism. Focusing on the affective experience of conversion, they developed forms of moral rigorism which represented, in both cases, an attempt to provide a reliable basis for Christian faith and practice in the fragmented intellectual context of post-reformation Europe.