Released on 2020-04-30Categories Literary Collections

Motion in Classical Literature

Motion in Classical Literature

Author: G. O. Hutchinson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192597724

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 304

View: 477

Classical literature is full of humans, gods, and animals in impressive motion. The specific features of this motion are expressive; it is closely intertwined with decisions, emotions, and character. However, although the importance of space has recently been realized with the advent of the 'spatial turn' in the humanities, motion has yet to receive such attention, for all its prominence in literature and its interest to ancient philosophy. This volume begins with an exploration of motion in particular works of visual art, and continues by examining the characteristics of literary depiction. Seven works are then used as case-studies: Homer's Iliad, Ovid's Metamorphoses, Tacitus' Annals, Sophocles' Philoctetes and Oedipus at Colonus, Parmenides' On Nature, and Seneca's Natural Questions. The two narrative poems diverge rewardingly, as do the philosophical poetry and prose. Important in the philosophical poem and the prose history are metaphorical motion and the absence of motion; the dramas scrutinize motion verbally and visually. Each study first pursues the general roles of motion in the particular work and provides detail on its language of motion. It then engages in close analysis of particular passages, to show how much emerges when motion is scrutinized. Among the aspects which emerge as important are speed, scale, and shape of movement; motion and fixity; the movement of one person and a group; motion willed and imposed; motion in images and in unrealized possibilities. The conclusion looks at these aspects across the works, and at differences of genre and period. This new and stimulating approach opens up extensive areas for interpretation; it can also be productively applied to the literature of successive eras.
Released on 2020-04-30Categories Literary Collections

Motion in Classical Literature

Motion in Classical Literature

Author: G. O. Hutchinson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192597731

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 304

View: 168

Classical literature is full of humans, gods, and animals in impressive motion. The specific features of this motion are expressive; it is closely intertwined with decisions, emotions, and character. However, although the importance of space has recently been realized with the advent of the 'spatial turn' in the humanities, motion has yet to receive such attention, for all its prominence in literature and its interest to ancient philosophy. This volume begins with an exploration of motion in particular works of visual art, and continues by examining the characteristics of literary depiction. Seven works are then used as case-studies: Homer's Iliad, Ovid's Metamorphoses, Tacitus' Annals, Sophocles' Philoctetes and Oedipus at Colonus, Parmenides' On Nature, and Seneca's Natural Questions. The two narrative poems diverge rewardingly, as do the philosophical poetry and prose. Important in the philosophical poem and the prose history are metaphorical motion and the absence of motion; the dramas scrutinize motion verbally and visually. Each study first pursues the general roles of motion in the particular work and provides detail on its language of motion. It then engages in close analysis of particular passages, to show how much emerges when motion is scrutinized. Among the aspects which emerge as important are speed, scale, and shape of movement; motion and fixity; the movement of one person and a group; motion willed and imposed; motion in images and in unrealized possibilities. The conclusion looks at these aspects across the works, and at differences of genre and period. This new and stimulating approach opens up extensive areas for interpretation; it can also be productively applied to the literature of successive eras.
Released on 2017-03-31Categories Literary Criticism

The Routledge Research Companion to Shakespeare and Classical Literature

The Routledge Research Companion to Shakespeare and Classical Literature

Author: Sean Keilen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317041672

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 334

View: 584

In this wide-ranging and ambitiously conceived Research Companion, contributors explore Shakespeare’s relationship to the classic in two broad senses. The essays analyze Shakespeare’s specific debts to classical works and weigh his classicism’s likeness and unlikeness to that of others in his time; they also evaluate the effects of that classical influence to assess the extent to which it is connected with whatever qualities still make Shakespeare, himself, a classic (arguably the classic) of modern world literature and drama. The first sense of the classic which the volume addresses is the classical culture of Latin and Greek reading, translation, and imitation. Education in the canon of pagan classics bound Shakespeare together with other writers in what was the dominant tradition of English and European poetry and drama, up through the nineteenth and even well into the twentieth century. Second—and no less central—is the idea of classics as such, that of books whose perceived value, exceeding that of most in their era, justifies their protection against historical and cultural change. The volume’s organizing insight is that as Shakespeare was made a classic in this second, antiquarian sense, his work’s reception has more and more come to resemble that of classics in the first sense—of ancient texts subject to labored critical study by masses of professional interpreters who are needed to mediate their meaning, simply because of the texts’ growing remoteness from ordinary life, language, and consciousness. The volume presents overviews and argumentative essays about the presence of Latin and Greek literature in Shakespeare’s writing. They coexist in the volume with thought pieces on the uses of the classical as a historical and pedagogical category, and with practical essays on the place of ancient classics in today’s Shakespearean classrooms.
Released on 2019-11-14Categories Literary Criticism

Classical Literature and Posthumanism

Classical Literature and Posthumanism

Author:

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350069527

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 480

View: 897

The subject of the posthuman, of what it means to be or to cease to be human, is emerging as a shared point of debate at large in the natural and social sciences and the humanities. This volume asks what classical learning can bring to the table of posthuman studies, assembling chapters that explore how exactly the human self of Greek and Latin literature understands its own relation to animals, monsters, objects, cyborgs and robotic devices. With its widely diverse habitat of heterogeneous bodies, minds, and selves, classical literature again and again blurs the boundaries between the human and the non-human; not to equate and confound the human with its other, but playfully to highlight difference and hybridity, as an invitation to appraise the animal, monstrous or mechanical/machinic parts lodged within humans. This comprehensive collection unites contributors from across the globe, each delving into a different classical text or narrative and its configuration of human subjectivity-how human selves relate to other entities around them. For students and scholars of classical literature and the posthuman, this book is a first point of reference.
Released on 1992-03-26Categories History

Beginnings in Classical Literature

Beginnings in Classical Literature

Author: Francis M. Dunn

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521413190

Category: History

Page: 258

View: 803

This volume explores the various ways in which literary works begin, with essays on nearly all the major genres of Greek and Latin literature (including epic and lyric poetry, tragedy and comedy, history, philosophy, and biography). This collection offers an important perspective by bringing together a variety of authors and a broad range of approaches, from formal analysis of opening devices to post-structural interpretation.
Released on 2018Categories History

Grattius

Grattius

Author: Steven J. Green

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198789017

Category: History

Page: 297

View: 792

Grattius' 'Cynegetica' is the author's only surviving work and can confidently be dated to the Augustan period, yet Grattius is seldom read in comparison to his literary contemporaries. This study of the poet aims to make his work accessible to a wide audience and provide an impetus for future discussions.