Released on 2019-12-12Categories

Post Celtic Tiger Landscapes in Irish Fiction

Post Celtic Tiger Landscapes in Irish Fiction

Author: Marie Mianowski

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0367885646

Category:

Page: 186

View: 225

Post Celtic Tiger Landscapes in Irish Fiction discusses the representations of place and landscape in Irish fiction since 2008. It includes novels and short stories by William Trevor, Dermot Bolger, Anne Enright, Donal Ryan, Claire Kilroy, Kevin Barry, Gerard Donovan, Danielle McLaughlin, Trisha McKinney, Billy O'Callaghan and Colum McCann. In the light of writings by geographers, anthropologists and philosophers such as Doreen Massey, Tim Ingold, Giorgio Agamben and Jeff Malpas, this book looks at the metamorphoses of place and landscape representations in fiction by confirmed or debut authors, in the aftermath of a crisis with deep economic as well as cultural consequences for Irish society. It shows what place and landscape representations reveal of the past, while discussing the way notions such as boundedness, openness and emergence can contribute to thinking out space and place and designing future landscapes.
Released on 2022-04-21Categories Literary Criticism

Form, Affect and Debt in Post-Celtic Tiger Irish Fiction

Form, Affect and Debt in Post-Celtic Tiger Irish Fiction

Author: Eoin Flannery

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350166769

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

View: 559

Based on readings of some of the leading literary voices in contemporary Irish writing, this book explores how these authors have engaged with the events of Ireland's recent economic 'boom' and the demise of the Celtic Tiger period, and how they have portrayed the widespread and contrasting aftermaths. Drawing upon economic literary criticism, affect theory in relation to shame and guilt, and the philosophy of debt, this book offers an entirely original suit of perspectives on both established and emerging authors. Through analyses of the work of writers including Donal Ryan, Anne Haverty, Claire Kilroy, Dermot Bolger, Deirdre Madden, Chris Binchy, Peter Cunningham, Justin Quinn, and Paul Murray, author Eóin Flannery illuminates their formal and thematic concerns. Paying attention to generic and thematic differences, Flannery's analyses touch upon issues such as: the politics of indebtedness; temporality and narrative form; the relevance of affect theory to understandings of Irish culture and society in an age of austerity; and the relationship between literary fiction and the mechanics of high finance. Insightful and original, Form, Affect and Debt in Post-Celtic Tiger Irish Fiction provides a seminal intervention in trying to grasp the cultural context and the literature of the Celtic Tiger period and its wake.
Released on 2021-05-10Categories Literary Criticism

Post-Celtic Tiger Ireland and Contemporary Women’s Writing

Post-Celtic Tiger Ireland and Contemporary Women’s Writing

Author: Claire Bracken

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000396270

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 214

View: 401

Post-Celtic Tiger Ireland and Contemporary Women’s Writing: Feminist Interventions and Imaginings analyzes and explores women’s writing of the post-Tiger period and reflects on the social, cultural, and economic conditions of this writing’s production. The Post-Celtic Tiger period (2008-) in Ireland marks an important moment in the history of women’s writing. It is a time of increased visibility and publication, dynamic feminist activism and collective projects, as well as a significant garnering of public recognition to a degree that has never been seen before. The collection is framed by interviews with Claire Kilroy and Melatu Okorie-two leading figures in the field-and closes with Okorie’s landmark short story on Direct Provision, "This Hostel Life." The book features the work of leading scholars in the field of contemporary literature, with essays on Anu Productions, Emma Donoghue, Grace Dyas, Anne Enright, Rita Ann Higgins, Marian Keyes, Claire Kilroy, Eimear McBride, Rosaleen McDonagh, Belinda McKeon, Melatu Okorie, Louise O’Neill, and Waking The Feminists. Reflecting on all the successes and achievements of women’s writing in the contemporary period, this book also considers marginalization and exclusions in the field, especially considering the politics of race, class, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, nationality, and ability. The chapters in this book were originally published in the journal LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory.
Released on 2016-12-14Categories History

Post Celtic Tiger Ireland

Post Celtic Tiger Ireland

Author: Estelle Epinoux

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781443855570

Category: History

Page: 233

View: 389

This collective volume provides the reader with an exploration of various artistic works which grew out of the post Celtic Tiger era in Ireland. The different cultural fields of interest studied in this book include theatre, photography, poetry, painting, and cinema, as well as commemorative spaces. These different cultural voices enable one to explore Ireland, as a country located at a crossroads, in a kind of in-between space, and to wonder about the various political, economic, historical and social forces present in the country. The contributions interrogate Irish society within its present context, which is deeply impregnated by movement and transition but also strongly connected to time, to past and to memory. This collection of essays also presents the way in which these artistic works intertwine with various approaches, artistic, aesthetic, sociologic, cinematographic, historical, and literary, in order to pinpoint the transformations induced by both the Celtic Tiger and its aftermath. The issues of globalisation, identity, place and creativity are all dealt with. In assessing the aftermath of the post Celtic Tiger period, its impact and influences on today’s Irish society, the contributors also allude, incidentally, to its future evolution and trends.
Released on 2002Categories Business & Economics

After the Celtic Tiger

After the Celtic Tiger

Author: J. Peter Clinch

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105111625849

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 207

View: 774

In the final years of the twentieth century Ireland was the economic wonder of the western world. The economy is now in transition and things have changed dramatically, especially in the light of September 11th. This book explains why Ireland has made such startling progress and identifies the policies which will help in our changing circumstances and carry us through into a bright future. It examines the Irish economic policy and its performance, the effect and challenges of globalization, environmental damage and climate change, and social issues such as housing, traffic, and immigration. From a background in economics, and with internationally recognized expertise, these three authors look at the current crisis and at the big quality of life issues which interest every human being.
Released on 2015-11-01Categories History

The domestic, moral and political economies of post-Celtic Tiger Ireland

The domestic, moral and political economies of post-Celtic Tiger Ireland

Author: Kieran Keohane

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9781526102201

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 275

This book provides an analysis of neo-liberal political economics implemented in Ireland and the deleterious consequences of that model in terms of polarised social inequalities, impoverished public services and fiscal vulnerability as they appear in central social policy domains – health, housing and education in particular. Tracing the argument into the domains where the institutions are sustained and reproduced, this book examines the movement of modern economics away from its original concern with the household and anthropologically universal deep human needs to care for the vulnerable – the sick, children and the elderly – and to maintain inter-generational solidarity. The authors argue that the financialisation of social relations undermines the foundations of civilisation and opens up a marketised barbarism. Civic catastrophes of violent conflict and authoritarian liberalism are here illustrated as aspects of the 'rough beast' that slouches in when things are falling apart and people become prey to new forms of domination.
Released on 2016-11-03Categories Literary Criticism

Post Celtic Tiger Landscapes in Irish Fiction

Post Celtic Tiger Landscapes in Irish Fiction

Author: Marie Mianowski

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781315387895

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 196

View: 387

Post Celtic Tiger Landscapes in Irish Fiction discusses the representations of place and landscape in Irish fiction since 2008. It includes novels and short stories by William Trevor, Dermot Bolger, Anne Enright, Donal Ryan, Claire Kilroy, Kevin Barry, Gerard Donovan, Danielle McLaughlin, Trisha McKinney, Billy O’Callaghan and Colum McCann. In the light of writings by geographers, anthropologists and philosophers such as Doreen Massey, Tim Ingold, Giorgio Agamben and Jeff Malpas, this book looks at the metamorphoses of place and landscape representations in fiction by confirmed or debut authors, in the aftermath of a crisis with deep economic as well as cultural consequences for Irish society. It shows what place and landscape representations reveal of the past, while discussing the way notions such as boundedness, openness and emergence can contribute to thinking out space and place and designing future landscapes.
Released on 2021-05-19Categories

Post-Celtic Tiger Ireland and Contemporary Women's Writing

Post-Celtic Tiger Ireland and Contemporary Women's Writing

Author: Claire Bracken

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0367465175

Category:

Page: 188

View: 121

Post-Celtic Tiger Ireland and Contemporary Women's Writing: Feminist Interventions and Imaginings analyzes and explores women's writing of the post-Tiger period and reflects on the social, cultural, and economic conditions of this writing's production. The Post-Celtic Tiger period (2008-) in Ireland marks an important moment in the history of women's writing. It is a time of increased visibility and publication, dynamic feminist activism and collective projects, as well as a significant garnering of public recognition to a degree that has never been seen before. The collection is framed by interviews with Claire Kilroy and Melatu Okorie-two leading figures in the field-and closes with Okorie's landmark short story on Direct Provision, "This Hostel Life." The book features the work of leading scholars in the field of contemporary literature, with essays on Anu Productions, Emma Donoghue, Grace Dyas, Anne Enright, Rita Ann Higgins, Marian Keyes, Claire Kilroy, Eimear McBride, Rosaleen McDonagh, Belinda McKeon, Melatu Okorie, Louise O'Neill, and Waking The Feminists. Reflecting on all the successes and achievements of women's writing in the contemporary period, this book also considers marginalization and exclusions in the field, especially considering the politics of race, class, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, nationality, and ability. The chapters in this book were originally published in the journal LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory.
Released on 2016-10-26Categories Music

Music and Irish Identity

Music and Irish Identity

Author: Gerry Smyth

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317092438

Category: Music

Page: 188

View: 377

Music and Irish Identity represents the latest stage in a life-long project for Gerry Smyth, focusing here on the ways in which music engages with particular aspects of Irish identity. The nature of popular music and the Irish identity it supposedly articulates have both undergone profound change in recent years: the first as a result of technological and wider industrial changes in the organisation and dissemination of music as seen, for example, with digital platforms such as YouTube, Spotify and iTunes. A second factor has been Ireland’s spectacular fall from economic grace after the demise of the "Celtic Tiger", and the ensuing crisis of national identity. Smyth argues that if, as the stereotypical association would have it, the Irish have always been a musical race, then that association needs re-examination in the light of developments in relation to both cultural practice and political identity. This book contributes to that process through a series of related case studies that are both scholarly and accessible. Some of the principal ideas broached in the text include the (re-)establishment of music as a key object of Irish cultural studies; the theoretical limitations of traditional musicology; the development of new methodologies specifically designed to address the demands of Irish music in all its aspects; and the impact of economic austerity on musical negotiations of Irish identity. The book will be of seminal importance to all those interested in popular music, cultural studies and the wider fate of Ireland in the twenty-first century.
Released on 2009-01-15Categories History

Theatre and Globalization

Theatre and Globalization

Author: Patrick Lonergan

Publisher: Palgrave MacMillan

ISBN: STANFORD:36105131764693

Category: History

Page: 276

View: 954

WINNER OF THE 2008 THEATRE BOOK PRIZE! Globalization is transforming theatre everywhere. As writers seek to exploit new opportunities to produce their work internationally, audiences are seeing the world – and the stage – differently. And, as national borders became more fluid, the barriers between economics and culture are also becoming weaker. In this groundbreaking study, Patrick Lonergan explores these developments, placing them in the context of the transformation of Ireland – the ‘most globalized country in the world’ – since the early 1990s. Drawing on archival material that has never before been published, this study sheds new light on the culture of Celtic Tiger Ireland, focusing on such writers as Brian Friel, Sean O’Casey, Marie Jones, Martin McDonagh, Marina Carr and Conor McPherson. In doing so, it shows how globalization poses difficult questions for authors and audiences – and reveals how we can begin to come to terms with these new developments.
Released on 2022Categories English fiction

Form, Affect and Debt in Post-Celtic Tiger Irish Fiction

Form, Affect and Debt in Post-Celtic Tiger Irish Fiction

Author: Eóin Flannery

Publisher:

ISBN: 1350302201

Category: English fiction

Page:

View: 326

"Based on readings of the most provocative voices in contemporary Irish writing, this book explores how these authors have engaged with the events of Ireland's recent economic 'boom' and the demise of the Celtic Tiger period, and how they have portrayed the widespread and contrastng aftermaths. Drawing upon economic literary criticism, affect theory in relation to shame and guilt, and the philosophy of debt, this book offers an entirely original suit of perspectives on both established and emerging authors. Through analyses of the work of writers including: Donal Ryan, Anne Haverty, Claire Kilroy, Dermot Bolger, Deirdre Madden, Chris Binchy, Peter Cunningham, Justin Quinn, Paul Murray, Paul Durcan and Rita Ann Higgins, author Eoin Flannery illuminates their formal and thematic concerns. Paying attention to generic and thematic differences, Flannery's analyses touch upon issues such as: the politics of indebtedness; temporality and narrative form; the relevance of affect theory to understandings of Irish culture and society in an age of austerity; ecocriticism and late capitalism; and the relationship between literary fiction and the mechanics of high finance. Insightful and original, Form, Affect and Debt in Post-Celtic Tiger Irish Fiction provides a seminal intervention in trying to grasp the cultural context and the literature of Celtic Tiger period and its wake"--
Released on 2014-03-27Categories Political Science

The Domestic, Moral and Political Economies of Post-Celtic Tiger Ireland

The Domestic, Moral and Political Economies of Post-Celtic Tiger Ireland

Author: Kieran Keohane

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 0719084822

Category: Political Science

Page: 208

View: 256

This book provides an analysis of neo-liberal political economics implemented in Ireland and the deleterious consequences of that model in terms of polarised social inequalities, impoverished public services and fiscal vulnerability as they appear in central social policy domains – health, housing, education, etc. Tracing the argument into the domains where the institutions of the lifeworld are sustained and reproduced, this book examines the disconnection of modern economics from its original concern with the oikos, the household, and anthropologically universal deep human needs to care for the vulnerable – the sick, children and the elderly, and to maintain inter-generational solidarity. The financialisation of social relations undermines the foundations of civilisation and opens up a marketised barbarism. Civic catastrophes of violent conflict and authoritarian liberalism are aspects of the 'rough beast' that slouches in when things are falling apart and people become prey to new forms of domination.