Released on 1997-04-22Categories Nature

John Muir: Nature Writings (LOA #92)

John Muir: Nature Writings (LOA #92)

Author: John Muir

Publisher: Library of America

ISBN: 9781598533422

Category: Nature

Page: 928

View: 441

In a lifetime of exploration, writing, and passionate political activism, John Muir became America's most eloquent spokesman for the mystery and majesty of the wilderness. A crucial figure in the creation of our national parks system and a far-seeing prophet of environmental awareness who founded the Sierra Club in 1892, he was also a master of natural description who evoked with unique power and intimacy the untrammeled landscapes of the American West. The Library of America's Nature Writings collects his most significant and best-loved works in a single volume, including: The Story of My Boyhood and Youth (1913), My First Summer in the Sierra (1911), The Mountains of California (1894) and Stickeen (1909). Rounding out the volume is a rich selection of essays—including "Yosemite Glaciers," "God's First Temples," "Snow-Storm on Mount Shasta," "The American Forests," and the late appeal "Save the Redwoods"—highlighting various aspects of his career: his exploration of the Grand Canyon and of what became Yosemite and Yellowstone national parks, his successful crusades to preserve the wilderness, his early walking tour to Florida, and the Alaska journey of 1879. LIBRARY OF AMERICA is an independent nonprofit cultural organization founded in 1979 to preserve our nation’s literary heritage by publishing, and keeping permanently in print, America’s best and most significant writing. The Library of America series includes more than 300 volumes to date, authoritative editions that average 1,000 pages in length, feature cloth covers, sewn bindings, and ribbon markers, and are printed on premium acid-free paper that will last for centuries.
Released on 2018-05-17Categories Design

History of Illustration

History of Illustration

Author: Susan Doyle

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9781628927559

Category: Design

Page: 592

View: 127

Winner of the 2019 CHOICE Award "The authoritative book on the origins, history, and influence of illustration. Bravo!" David Brinley, University of Delaware, USA History of Illustration covers image-making and print history from around the world, spanning from the ancient to the modern. Hundreds of color images show illustrations within their social, cultural, and technical context, while they are ordered from the past to the present. Readers will be able to analyze images for their displayed techniques, cultural standards, and ideas to appreciate the art form. This essential guide is the first history of illustration written by an international team of illustration historians, practitioners, and educators.
Released on 2004-04-22Categories Business & Economics

Culture, Technology, and the Creation of America's National Parks

Culture, Technology, and the Creation of America's National Parks

Author: Richard A. Grusin

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521826497

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 244

View: 411

Grusin shows that while establishing a national park does involve preserving an area of land as a "natural" rather than economic asset, a ranch or mine for instance, it also transforms the landscape into a culturally constructed object called "nature.""--BOOK JACKET.
Released on 2007-01-01Categories Literary Criticism

One True Theory & the Quest for an American Aesthetic

One True Theory & the Quest for an American Aesthetic

Author: Martha Banta

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300122978

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 336

View: 219

Martha Banta reaches across several disciplines to investigate America's early quest to shape an aesthetic equal to the nation's belief in its cultural worth. Marked by an unusually wide-ranging sweep, the book focuses on three major "testing grounds" where nineteenth-century Americans responded to Ralph Waldo Emerson's call to embrace "everything" in order to uncover the theoretical principles underlying "the idea of creation." The interactions of those who rose to this urgent challenge?artists, architects, writers, politicians, and the technocrats of scientific inquiry?brought about an engrossing tangle of achievements and failures. The first section of the book traces efforts to advance the status of the arts in the face of the aspersion that America lacked an Art Soul as deep as Europe's. Following that is a hard look at heated political debates over how to embellish the architecture of Washington, D.C., with the icons of cherished republican ideals. The concluding section probes novels in which artists' lives are portrayed and aesthetic principles tested.
Released on 2010-09-24Categories Biography & Autobiography

I Wonder as I Wander

I Wonder as I Wander

Author: Ron Pen

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 9780813125985

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 408

View: 585

Louisville native John Jacob Niles (1892–1980) is considered to be one of our nation’s most influential musicians. As a composer and balladeer, Niles drew inspiration from the deep well of traditional Appalachian and African American folk songs. At the age of sixteen Niles wrote one of his most enduring tunes, “Go ’Way from My Window,” basing it on a song fragment from a black farm worker. This iconic song has been performed by folk artists ever since and may even have inspired the opening line of Bob Dylan’s “It Ain’t Me Babe.” In I Wonder as I Wander: The Life of John Jacob Niles, the first full-length biography of Niles, Ron Pen offers a rich portrait of the musician’s character and career. Using Niles’s own accounts from his journals, notebooks, and unpublished autobiography, Pen tracks his rise from farm boy to songwriter and folk collector extraordinaire. Niles was especially interested in documenting the voices of his fellow World War I soldiers, the people of Appalachia, and the spirituals of African Americans. In the 1920s he collaborated with noted photographer Doris Ulmann during trips to Appalachia, where he transcribed, adapted, and arranged traditional songs and ballads such as “Pretty Polly” and “Black Is the Color of My True Love’s Hair.” Niles’s preservation and presentation of American folk songs earned him the title of “Dean of American Balladeers,” and his theatrical use of the dulcimer is credited with contributing to the popularity of that instrument today. Niles’s dedication to the folk music tradition lives on in generations of folk revival artists such as Jean Ritchie, Joan Baez, and Oscar Brand. I Wonder as I Wander explores the origins and influences of the American folk music resurgence of the 1950s and 1960s, and finally tells the story of a man at the forefront of that movement.