Released on 2013-07-25Categories Language Arts & Disciplines

The Evolutionary Emergence of Language

The Evolutionary Emergence of Language

Author: Rudolf Botha

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199654840

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 334

View: 865

The book presents new and stimulating approaches to the study of language evolution and considers their implications for future research. Leading scholars from linguistics, primatology, anthroplogy, and cognitive science consider how language evolution can be understood by means of inference from the study of linked or analogous phenomena in language, animal behaviour, genetics, neurology, culture, and biology. In their introduction the editors show how these approaches can be interrelated and deployed together through their use of comparable forms of inference and the similar conditions they place on the use of evidence. The Evolutionary Emergence of Language will interest everyone concerned with this intriguing and important subject, including those in linguistics, biology, anthropology, archaeology, neurology, and cognitive science.
Released on 2013Categories Historical linguistics

The Evolutionary Emergence of Language

The Evolutionary Emergence of Language

Author: Oxford University Press

Publisher:

ISBN: 0191759007

Category: Historical linguistics

Page: 334

View: 593

Leading primatologists, cognitive scientists, anthropologists and linguists consider how language evolution can be understood by means of inference from the study of linked or analogous phenomena in language, animal behaviour, genetics, neurology culture, and biology.
Released on 1998-09-17Categories Language Arts & Disciplines

Approaches to the Evolution of Language

Approaches to the Evolution of Language

Author: James Raymond Hurford

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521639646

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 442

View: 512

This is one of the first systematic attempts to bring language within the neo-Darwinian framework of modern evolutionary theory, without abandoning the vast gains in phonology and syntax achieved by formal linguistics over the past forty years. The contributors, linguists, psychologists, and paleoanthropologists, address such questions as: what is language as a category of behavior; is it an instrument of thought or of communication; what do individuals know when they know a language; what cognitive, perceptual, and motor capacities must they have to speak, hear, and understand a language? For the past two centuries, scientists have tended to see language function as largely concerned with the exchange of practical information. By contrast, this volume takes as its starting point the view of human intelligence as social, and of language as a device for forming alliances, in exploring the origins of the sound patterns and formal structures that characterize language.
Released on 2002Categories Computers

Simulating the Evolution of Language

Simulating the Evolution of Language

Author: Angelo Cangelosi

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: UOM:39015055574688

Category: Computers

Page: 376

View: 885

This book is the first to provide a comprehensive survey of the computational models and methodologies used for studying the evolution and origin of language and communication. Comprising contributions from the most influential figures in the field, it presents and summarises the state-of-the-art in computational approaches to language evolution, and highlights new lines of development. Essential reading for researchers and students in the fields of evolutionary and adaptive systems, language evolution modelling and linguistics, it will also be of interest to researchers working on applications of neural networks to language problems. Furthermore, due to the fact that language evolution models use multi-agent methodologies, it will also be of great interest to computer scientists working on multi-agent systems, robotics and internet agents.
Released on 2007-01-04Categories Language Arts & Disciplines

Why We Talk

Why We Talk

Author: Jean-Louis Dessalles

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199276234

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 384

View: 726

Constant exchange of information is integral to our societies. The author explores how this came into being. Presenting language evolution as a natural history of conversation, he sheds light on the emergence of communication in the hominine congregations, as well as on the human nature.
Released on 2009-07-07Categories Language Arts & Disciplines

Language, Evolution, and the Brain

Language, Evolution, and the Brain

Author: James W. MINETTinett

Publisher: City University of HK Press

ISBN: 9789629371654

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 307

View: 598

A number of research groups around the world have begun to study how the brain acquires and processes language, but we still know comparatively little about it. Many such groups work on very specific, often narrow, problems. This approach is certainly necessary, but a broad perspective can be helpful, if not essential, too. This volume consists of an important collection of papers presented at the Seminar on Language, Evolution, and the Brain (SLEB), hosted by the International Institute for Advanced Studies in Kyoto, Japan, bringing together distinguished researchers with background in cognitive science, anthropology, linguistics, robotics, physics, etc. Major topics discussed here include: Creoles and pidgins, and their implications regarding language evolution. Quantitative analysis and modeling of various aspects of language evolution, including the evolution of lexical items and color terms, the emergence of linguistics categories, and the dynamics of language competition. The evolution of the human brain, and how that relates to language evolution. The evolution and the role of mirror neurons in both humans and non-humans. Evidence that the influence of language on color perception (an example of the Whorf Effect) is stronger for the right visual field than the left. This volume provides a multi-faceted discussion of how language evolves and shapes the brain that may entice university students and researchers to delve into this field with more background and curiosity.
Released on 2010Categories Historical linguistics

The Evolution of Language

The Evolution of Language

Author: Andrew D. M. Smith

Publisher: World Scientific

ISBN: 9789814295222

Category: Historical linguistics

Page: 552

View: 987

This volume comprises refereed papers and abstracts of the 8th International Conference on the Evolution of Language (EVOLANG8), held in Utrecht on 14-17 April 2010. As the leading international conference in the field, the biennial EVOLANG meeting is characterized by an invigorating, multidisciplinary approach to the origins and evolution of human language, and brings together researchers from many subject areas, including anthropology, archaeology, biology, cognitive science, computer science, genetics, linguistics, neuroscience, palaeontology, primatology and psychology. The latest theoretical, experimental and modelling research on language evolution is presented in this collection, including contributions from many leading scientists in the field.
Released on 2008-08-27Categories Language Arts & Disciplines

Variation, Selection, Development

Variation, Selection, Development

Author: Regine Eckardt

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 9783110205398

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 416

View: 304

Can language change be modelled as an evolutionary process? Can notions like variation, selection and competition be fruitfully applied to facts of language development? The present volume ties together various strands of linguistic research which can bring us towards an answer to these questions. In one of the youngest and rapidly growing areas of linguistic research, mathematical models and simulations of competition based developments have been applied to instances of language change. By matching the predicted and observed developmental trends, researchers gauge existing models to the needs of linguistic applications and evaluate the fruitfulness of evolutionary models in linguistics. The present volume confronts these studies with more empirically-based studies in creolization and historical language change which bear on key concepts of evolutionary models. What does it mean for a linguistic construction to survive its competitors? How do the interacting factors in phases of creolization differ from those in ordinary language change, and how - consequently - might Creole languages differ structurally from older languages? Some of the authors, finally, also address the question how different aspects of our linguistic competence tie in with our more elementary cognitive capacities. The volume contains contributions by Brady Clark et al., Elly van Gelderen, Alain Kihm, Manfred Krifka, Wouter Kusters, Robert van Rooij, Anette Rosenbach, John McWhorter, Teresa Satterfield, Michael Tomasello and Elizabeth C. Traugott. The book brings together contributions from two areas of research: the study of language evolution by means of methods from artifical intelligence/artificial life (like computer simulations and analytic mathematical methods) on the one hand, and empirically oriented research from historical linguistics and creolisation studies that uses concepts from evolutionary theory as a heuristic tool in a qualitative way. The book is thus interesting for readers from both traditions because it supplies them with information about relevant ongoing research and useful methods and data from the other camp.
Released on 2002-01-01Categories Psychology

Mirror Neurons and the Evolution of Brain and Language

Mirror Neurons and the Evolution of Brain and Language

Author: Maksim Stamenov

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN: 9027251665

Category: Psychology

Page: 390

View: 538

The emergence of language, social intelligence, and tool development are what made homo sapiens sapiens differentiate itself from all other biological species in the world. The use of language and the management of social and instrumental skills imply an awareness of intention and the consideration that one faces another individual with an attitude analogical to that of one's own. The metaphor of 'mirror' aptly comes to mind.Recent investigations have shown that the human ability to 'mirror' other's actions originates in the brain at a much deeper level than phenomenal awareness. A new class of neurons has been discovered in the premotor area of the monkey brain: 'mirror neurons'. Quite remarkably, they are tuned to fire to the enaction as well as observation of specific classes of behavior: fine manual actions and actions performed by mouth. They become activated independent of the agent, be it the self or a third person whose action is observed. The activation in mirror neurons is automatic and binds the observation and enaction of some behavior by the self or by the observed other. The peculiar first-to-third-person 'intersubjectivity' of the performance of mirror neurons and their surprising complementarity to the functioning of strategic communicative face-to-face (first-to-second person) interaction may shed new light on the functional architecture of conscious vs. unconscious mental processes and the relationship between behavioral and communicative action in monkeys, primates, and humans. The present volume discusses the nature of mirror neurons as presented by the research team of Prof. Giacomo Rizzolatti (University of Parma), who originally discovered them, and the implications to our understanding of the evolution of brain, mind and communicative interaction in non-human primates and man.(Series B)